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Lateral view of a Male Baetis (Baetidae) (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Dun from Mystery Creek #43 in New York
Blue-winged Olives
Baetis

Tiny Baetis mayflies are perhaps the most commonly encountered and imitated by anglers on all American trout streams due to their great abundance, widespread distribution, and trout-friendly emergence habits.

Dorsal view of a Epeorus albertae (Heptageniidae) (Pink Lady) Mayfly Nymph from the East Fork Issaquah Creek in Washington
This specimen keys to the Epeorus albertae group of species. Of the five species in that group, the two known in Washington state are Epeorus albertae and Epeorus dulciana. Of the two, albertae has been collected in vastly more locations in Washington than dulciana, suggesting it is far more common. On that basis alone I'm tentatively putting this nymph in albertae, with the large caveat that there's no real information to rule out dulciana.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
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Jmd123 has attached this picture. The message is below.
Probably my last of this species for 2017
Jmd123
Jmd123's profile picture
Oscoda, MI

Posts: 2474
Jmd123 on Oct 15, 2017October 15th, 2017, 1:45 pm EDT
First of all, the fishing: got this pretty brookie on the very last night of trout season here in MI (couple weeks ago), out of a nice reach of the Pine within which I had no company. Other than a fellow and his dog hunting partridge, who came down and said hi to me. Caddis flies were on the wing in numbers! Nice big #12s and #14s too, and EHCs in those sizes did the trick. Nothing large though, lots of little rainbows topping out at 8", so this was the big guy for the night. Now my brookie spots are pretty much closed until almost May.

I have also hit the open section (most of it) of the Rifle, and a week ago Friday got a rare skunking. Fish acted really skittish, like some canoes/kayaks are still going down, or another fisherman tromped though there before me. This Friday I did score a couple browns on #12 White Wulffs thrown into quiet waters, to fish that weren't feeding but decided they were on the Wulffs...missed enough strikes to tempt me back there once or twice more before it really gets ccccold around here. Reid Lake tomorrow, if the winds aren't too high.

Here's my question, ladies and gentlemen: do "breathable" waders "breathe" for you? They DO NOT for me! My latest adventures in waders always seem to have me end up sweating like I'm in a plastic bag or something. Including last time, with air temps. in the low 60s to high 50s, not exactly warm water, and cloudy skies. To be honest, I've owned probably 5 pairs of so-called "breathable waders" and the concept just doesn't seem to work for me. Now, they LOOK much better than older-style waders, and they're much cooler to wear than neoprene and flexible enough to climb over logs, etc. But as for letting my sweat out, it ain't happening. I would appreciate opinions and experiences from the greater Troutnut gene pool on this matter. Thanks, and tight lines to all until its too danged cold!

Jonathon
No matter how big the one you just caught is, there's always a bigger one out there somewhere...
Taxon
Taxon's profile picture
Site Editor
Plano, TX

Posts: 1311
Taxon on Oct 15, 2017October 15th, 2017, 4:47 pm EDT
Hi Jonathan-

Pretty brookie.

In my experience, the answer to the question you posed is a definite yes, they do breathe for me. Have owned four pairs of stocking-foot waders. The last two were Simms neoprene stocking-foot chest waders, and Simms gortex stocking-foot chest waders.

I would perspire heavily from the even the slightest exertion in all three pairs of neoprene waders, but not anywhere near as much in my gortex waders.
Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
Partsman
Partsman's profile picture
bancroft michigan

Posts: 321
Partsman on Oct 16, 2017October 16th, 2017, 2:31 am EDT
Jonathon, I have had mixed results, but this year I bought a pair of orvis silver sonics and boa boots. What a difference for me, I love them and I'm much more comfortable. As I get older my personal comfort tends to be a big factor in the total experience. Nice brookie, this season went by far to quickly, I think I'm going up to the s,b. ausable in the morning, looks like it going to be a nice day!

Mike.
RleeP
NW PA - Pennsylvania's Glacial Pothole Wonderland

Posts: 398
RleeP on Oct 16, 2017October 16th, 2017, 5:09 am EDT
>>I would perspire heavily from the even the slightest exertion in all three pairs of neoprene waders, but not anywhere near as much in my gortex waders.>>

My experience pretty much parallels Roger's.. I'd describe it (the breathable wader thing..) as a matter of degree and perspective. I perspire a lot less in so-called "breathables" than I used to in neoprenes or the older Hodgeman/Red Ball rubber/canvas waders, But I still perspire a bit more than I'd like.

It's times like these when it comes in handy to see the glass as being half full...:)
Jmd123
Jmd123's profile picture
Oscoda, MI

Posts: 2474
Jmd123 on Oct 16, 2017October 16th, 2017, 1:54 pm EDT
"As I get older my personal comfort tends to be a big factor in the total experience."

Amen to that, Mike! As I tell people who think ice fishing is too cold: if you're cold, you're not doing it right. Personal comfort can mean the difference between getting tired and worn out or making it up to the next couple of holes - and possibly scoring some nice fish you would have missed otherwise...

"I'd describe it (the breathable wader thing..) as a matter of degree and perspective."

Agreed, Lee. As I said above, they are better than the older stuff, that much is absolutely true. I guess what I'm after is truth in advertising - they really don't let all the sweat out and keep all the water out like it shows in the fancy advertisements they used to have, at least like I said not for me. And what I wear under them is a light t-shirt and light cotton cargo pants, or in hotter weather I'll go with shorts. Or no waders and swim trunks with wading shoes when its warm enough - doesn't give you the shin protection but sure makes it easier to get around obstacles! And should you take a swim (been there done that) you don't have to worry about filling up waders & turning into your very own anchor...

Went to Reid Lake today, only to find a cold stiff wind, uncooperative fish, and a leaking kayak soaking all of my gear including my pants...gonna take a break and go to the shooting range, before its too darned cold to do that too.

Tight lines, gentlemen!

Jonathon

With regards to the "glass half-full/half-empty" question:

If the missing half was enjoyed, the glass is half full, you still have half of it left to enjoy.

If the missing half was spilled, well dammit now its half empty!!

No matter how big the one you just caught is, there's always a bigger one out there somewhere...
Wbranch
Wbranch's profile picture
York & Starlight PA

Posts: 2635
Wbranch on Oct 17, 2017October 17th, 2017, 1:13 am EDT
Jonathon,

My Simms waders do breath for me in most instances but if the water is very cold and the air is very warm when I take the waders off after 4 or 5 hours of wading crotch to waist deep my Supplex wading pants are damp from mid thigh to the top of my wading socks. As soon as I roll the socks down the pants are dry. I think it has to do with the condensation that is created by the 55 - 60 degree water temperature and the 90 - 95 degree air temperature.
Catskill fly fisher for fifty-five years.
CaseyP
CaseyP's profile picture
Arlington, VA/ Mercersburg, PA

Posts: 653
CaseyP on Oct 18, 2017October 18th, 2017, 8:33 am EDT
Best Fishing Buddy is basically a human greenhouse. Ski goggles, diving mask, you name it, it will fog. waders used to seem useless until he stopped wearing a wading belt. problem solved, condensation gone.
and don't perpetuate the myth that he will drown if he falls in. he didn't. he just had waders full of water that he had to drop and empty out before he could climb out of the stream.
"You can observe a lot by watching." Yogi Berra
John1234456
Mason

Posts: 1
John1234456 on Oct 21, 2017October 21st, 2017, 7:01 am EDT
Hey there, quick question since you all seem like you know what you’re talking about. I just caught and rainbow and took it out of the water real quick for pictures, and it started spewing eggs everywhere. I immediately put it back in the water and it swam off after reviving it, but do y’all know if it will live?
Partsman
Partsman's profile picture
bancroft michigan

Posts: 321
Partsman on Oct 21, 2017October 21st, 2017, 12:42 pm EDT
John if you live Mason Michigan and were fishing the Grand river or a trib you know doubt caught a salmon. Rainbows and there lake run brothers steelhead spawn in the spring. If I'm right and it is a salmon no it wont live but it may spawn and reproduce. There is all kinds of info on great lakes salmon and steelhead, just google it.

Mike.

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