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Lateral view of a Female Hexagenia limbata (Ephemeridae) (Hex) Mayfly Dun from the Namekagon River in Wisconsin
Hex Mayflies
Hexagenia limbata

The famous nocturnal Hex hatch of the Midwest (and a few other lucky locations) stirs to the surface mythically large brown trout that only touch streamers for the rest of the year.

Dorsal view of a Zapada cinctipes (Nemouridae) (Tiny Winter Black) Stonefly Nymph from the Yakima River in Washington
Nymphs of this species were fairly common in late-winter kick net samples from the upper Yakima River. Although I could not find a key to species of Zapada nymphs, a revision of the Nemouridae family by Baumann (1975) includes the following helpful sentence: "2 cervical gills on each side of midline, 1 arising inside and 1 outside of lateral cervical sclerites, usually single and elongate, sometimes constricted but with 3 or 4 branches arising beyond gill base in Zapada cinctipes." This specimen clearly has the branches and is within the range of that species.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
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Troutnut.com User JAD (John Dunn)

Troutnut.com User JAD (John Dunn)

Real Name
John Dunn
Location
Alexandria Pa
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Biography & Thoughts

One of which is the "standard" downwing tent shaped wings used on many wet fly imitations of duns. When one knows that "Duns" was once the name for "Caddis flies", then the reason for the wing shape becomes clear. At some point, people began copying the old patterns, and using flies which were designed to copy duns, but simply neglected to mention, or simply did not know, that these flies were designed to imitate caddis flies, and NOT mayfly duns as used in modern nomenclature. Hence my name (Caddisman)
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They fasten red (crimson red) wool around a hook, and fix onto the wool two feathers which grow under a cock’s wattles, and which in colour are like wax.
Radcliffe's Fishing from the Earliest Times,

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