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Baetis

Tiny Baetis mayflies are perhaps the most commonly encountered and imitated by anglers on all American trout streams due to their great abundance, widespread distribution, and trout-friendly emergence habits.

July 4th getaway to a small stream


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By Troutnut on July 4th, 2020
Looking to do something outdoors and asocial during July 4th of the year of Covid-19, I took my wife to a small stream full of feisty westslope cutthroat trout. Of course, being July 4th, there were a few people around the easy-to-access spots (i.e. places to drive and set up a cushy camp ten feet from the truck), but it was easy to walk past them and have a beautiful little stream to ourselves. I'm both baffled and grateful that so few people see the value in chasing little trout in pretty little streams.

Videos by Troutnut from Mystery Creek #249 in Washington

Cinygmula par mating flight

It's remarkable what thick hatches, and especially spinner flights, can come from a species few anglers have ever heard of. The genus Cinygmula is thought to produce unremarkable spinner flights, but this one would certainly have gotten the trout going if it weren't happening just before dark on a small stream where there isn't a lot of nocturnal feeding.

Photos by Troutnut from Mystery Creek #249 in Washington

Closeup insects by Troutnut from Mystery Creek #249 in Washington

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