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Artistic view of a Male Pteronarcys californica (Pteronarcyidae) (Giant Salmonfly) Stonefly Adult from the Gallatin River in Montana
Salmonflies
Pteronarcys californica

The giant Salmonflies of the Western mountains are legendary for their proclivity to elicit consistent dry-fly action and ferocious strikes.

Dorsal view of a Limnephilidae (Giant Sedges) Caddisfly Larva from the Yakima River in Washington
This specimen resembled several others of around the same size and perhaps the same species, which were pretty common in my February sample from the upper Yakima. Unfortunately, I misplaced the specimen before I could get it under a microscope for a definitive ID.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
Troutnut is a project started in 2003 by salmonid ecologist Jason "Troutnut" Neuswanger to help anglers and fly tyers unabashedly embrace the entomological side of the sport. Learn more about Troutnut or support the project for an enhanced experience here.

WestCO
WestCO's profile picture
Palisade, CO

Posts: 65
WestCO on Oct 26, 2013October 26th, 2013, 3:51 pm EDT
I'm trying to find a nice outer shell that is light enough for spring and fall, but heavy enough to be an outer layer in the winter. I am pretty good at layering up, for the most part I just need something that will seal the deal. At this point I've narrowed it down to the Bulkley and the Guide. Anyone with any experience that can tell me about these? Thanks!
...but fishermen I have noticed, they don't care if I'm rich or poor, wearing robes or waders, all they care about is the fish, the river, and the game we play. For fishermen, the only virtues are patience, tolerance, and humility. I like this.
Entoman
Entoman's profile picture
Northern CA & ID

Posts: 2604
Entoman on Oct 27, 2013October 27th, 2013, 9:52 am EDT
The Guide is the best wading jacket ever. It's comfortable, fully waterproof yet highly breathable, and tough as nails. Same for their waders. I've really put the gear through the ringer (sliding down rocky banks and crashing through brush & brier) fishing in them on average a couple times a week for more than a decade. The stuff is expensive, but worth the price IMO. I've field tested some knock-offs in this time period that didn't cut the mustard.

Tip: when a leak springs up (there've been a couple over the years) spritz the area on the inside with alcohol. The precise location will turn purple. Cover the purple with thinned AquaSeal for an easy, permanent fix.

Tip2: At the end of the season, wash them on gentle cycle with a little mild detergent. Spray them with a product called Revivex and throw them in the drier. The next season, water will bead up like when they were brand new.
"It's not that I find fishing so important, it's just that I find all other endeavors of Man equally unimportant... And not nearly as much fun!" Robert Traver, Anatomy of a Fisherman
WestCO
WestCO's profile picture
Palisade, CO

Posts: 65
WestCO on Oct 28, 2013October 28th, 2013, 8:05 am EDT
I've had Simms waders forever so I'm very familiar with the quality of Simms products. That's why I'm going that direction for the jacket. I just can't decide between the two. But thanks for the insight on the Guide jacket. Has anybody ever worn the Bulkley jacket?
...but fishermen I have noticed, they don't care if I'm rich or poor, wearing robes or waders, all they care about is the fish, the river, and the game we play. For fishermen, the only virtues are patience, tolerance, and humility. I like this.
Entoman
Entoman's profile picture
Northern CA & ID

Posts: 2604
Entoman on Nov 8, 2013November 8th, 2013, 12:47 am EST
Ah, I misunderstood you. I've owned several insulated WJs but would never buy another. Why?

1. It's best to keep your insulating layers underneath your waders. You'll be warmer to begin with and it's amazing how water wicks up into the insulation even without wading too deep. When that happens, misery is guaranteed. Learned this the hard way.:)

2. Ironically, while not as warm as the Guide w/ proper layering they are too warm most of the year and thus not very versatile.

3. Very difficult to patch - how can you test for leaks (it will leak at some point) or patch from the inside with insulation in the way?

4. Insulation attached directly to the jacket makes it less capable at breathing, despite marketing claims.

5. When ice is forming on the surface of rivers, there had better be a change of clothes nearby, either in boat, car or backpack. I have shaken out the water from the Guide and put it back on over dry fleece and been perfectly comfortable. It's dry as a bone after a bit. Can't do that with a soaked insulated WJ. This ability is important to avoid hypothermia in the event of a slip. It could be a matter of life or death.

Bottom line, get the Guide and wear an extra fleece jacket or heavy wool sweater tucked into your waders when it's really cold. I've got hundreds of days on frozen Winter steelhead rivers with the Guide and have never been cold - due to the jacket, anyway...:)



"It's not that I find fishing so important, it's just that I find all other endeavors of Man equally unimportant... And not nearly as much fun!" Robert Traver, Anatomy of a Fisherman

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