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Artistic view of a Male Pteronarcys californica (Pteronarcyidae) (Giant Salmonfly) Stonefly Adult from the Gallatin River in Montana
Salmonflies
Pteronarcys californica

The giant Salmonflies of the Western mountains are legendary for their proclivity to elicit consistent dry-fly action and ferocious strikes.

Lateral view of a Onocosmoecus (Limnephilidae) (Great Late-Summer Sedge) Caddisfly Larva from the Yakima River in Washington
This specimen keys pretty easily to Onocosmoecus, and it closely resembles a specimen from Alaska which caddis expert Dave Ruiter recognized as this genus. As with that specimen, the only species in the genus documented in this area is Onocosmoecus unicolor, but Dave suggested for that specimen that there might be multiple not-yet-distinguished species under the unicolor umbrella and it would be best to stick with the genus-level ID. I'm doing the same for this one.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
Troutnut is a project started in 2003 by salmonid ecologist Jason "Troutnut" Neuswanger to help anglers and fly tyers unabashedly embrace the entomological side of the sport. Learn more about Troutnut or support the project for an enhanced experience here.

This topic is about the Mayfly Genus Serratella

Prior to recent revisions, this genus of elegant little dark mayflies with their small dark bodies, dark slate wings, and paler legs and tails was more important to anglers. What was the East's most significant species is now known as Teloganopsis deficiens (Little Black Quill). The only remaining species reported of value to the eastern angler is Serratella serrata (Little Sooty Olive).

These changes have had an even bigger impact in the West. The significant Summer hatching tibialis has been moved back to its old genus and is again called Ephemerella tibialis (Small Western Dark Hendrickson). The next most prominent species (though of only minor importance) is now called Matriella teresa and is the only recognized species of that genus in North America. The very minor species velmae has also been moved, and is now back in Ephemerella. This leaves only a few western species in this genus, and they are of no reported significance to anglers.

Example specimens

Goose
Posts: 77
Goose on Oct 4, 2006October 4th, 2006, 1:20 am EDT
Jason: I was fishing in Central PA with a buddy on Sunday and we collected 2 different BWO species from the water. A really small one, about 22 to 24, had an olive/gray body. The other, which was about a size 20, had a gray body and thorax and was matched well with natural beaver fur. I don't know the names, of course, but I saw them with my own eyes. We did well fishing an emerger/dun pattern in sizes 20 and 22. We tied some with trailing shucks of amber or dun. We used a light olive thread for the body, sparse gray beaver dubbing for the thorax, and dun snow shoe for the wing.
Troutnut
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Administrator
Bellevue, WA

Posts: 2758
Troutnut on Oct 4, 2006October 4th, 2006, 4:45 am EDT
Yeah, BWOs certainly aren't unusual at this time of year... they provide some of the best fishing we've got left. Several species in the Baetidae family are still going strong. What's strange is finding one in that size range in the Ephemerellidae family.
Jason Neuswanger, Ph.D.
Troutnut and salmonid ecologist

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