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Lateral view of a Female Hexagenia limbata (Ephemeridae) (Hex) Mayfly Dun from the Namekagon River in Wisconsin
Hex Mayflies
Hexagenia limbata

The famous nocturnal Hex hatch of the Midwest (and a few other lucky locations) stirs to the surface mythically large brown trout that only touch streamers for the rest of the year.

27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
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Millcreek has attached these 4 pictures. The message is below.
Female. Collected May 4, 2014.
Male. Collected May 4, 2014.
Male. Collected May 4, 2014.
Males. Collected May 4, 2014.
Millcreek
Healdsburg, CA

Posts: 344
Millcreek on Oct 13, 2014October 13th, 2014, 10:13 am EDT
Serratella micheneri nymphs are common in the Russian River from April through May. Most are found in glides with a substrate of large gravel and cobble in a moderate current. Usually found in large numbers on single rocks. I ID'd them to genus using Merritt, Cummins and Berg (2008) and to species with Allen and Edmunds "A Revision of the Genus Ephemerella (Ephemeroptera: Ephemerellidae). VI. The Subgenus Serratella in North America" (1963)http://www.ephemeroptera-galactica.com/pubs/pub_a/puballenr1963p583.pdf and Jacobus and McCafferty "Revisionary Contributions to North American Ephemerella and Serratella (Ephemeroptera: Ephemerellidae) (2003)http://www.ephemeroptera-galactica.com/pubs/pub_j/pubjacobusl2003p174.pdf.

Nymphs are 5-7 mm in length (excluding cerci).
"If we knew what it was we were doing, it would not be called research, would it?"
-Albert Einstein
PaulRoberts
PaulRoberts's profile picture
Colorado

Posts: 1776
PaulRoberts on Oct 13, 2014October 13th, 2014, 3:49 pm EDT
Wow! Pretty critters they are.
Millcreek
Healdsburg, CA

Posts: 344
Millcreek on Oct 13, 2014October 13th, 2014, 4:40 pm EDT
Paul-
Yeah, they are pretty little varmints and like a lot of animals that have a pattern that's broken up like this they're really well camouflaged when in their regular habitat and not in a petri dish. Hope to get some photos of them on rocks next year.
Have you seen these in Colorado? Apparently they've been reported there, as well as a number of other western states.
"If we knew what it was we were doing, it would not be called research, would it?"
-Albert Einstein

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