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Lateral view of a Male Baetis (Baetidae) (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Dun from Mystery Creek #43 in New York
Blue-winged Olives
Baetis

Tiny Baetis mayflies are perhaps the most commonly encountered and imitated by anglers on all American trout streams due to their great abundance, widespread distribution, and trout-friendly emergence habits.

Dorsal view of a Glossosoma (Glossosomatidae) (Little Brown Short-horned Sedge) Caddisfly Larva from the Yakima River in Washington
I caught this tiny larva without a case, but it seems to key pretty clearly to to Glossosomatidae. From there, the lack of sclerites on the mesonotum points to either Glossosoma or Anagapetus. Although it's difficult to see in a 2D image from the microscope, it's pretty clear in the live 3D view that the pronotum is only excised about 1/3 of its length to accommodate the forecoxa, not 2/3, which points to Glossosoma at Couplet 5 of the Key to Genera of Glossosomatidae Larvae.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
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This topic is about the Arthropod Order Isopoda

Sowbugs are not quite as prolific or as important as scuds (Amphipoda), but in certain waters they are more common and serve the same role.

They should not be imitated with the same patterns because they are much more wide and tend to sprawl their legs to the side instead of tucking them neatly under the body. They crawl around instead of swimming, so they are probably best imitated with a dead-drift.

They produce new broods once every two months, allowing them to populate a stream very quickly if enough food is there to support them.

This order also includes popular terrestrial species commonly known as pillbugs or rolly polies. They aren't known to be relevant to fly fishermen.

Example specimens

Martinlf
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Moderator
Palmyra PA

Posts: 3047
Martinlf on Jan 26, 2011January 26th, 2011, 6:06 am EST
Do these look like the bug you ask about in your post?
"He spread them a yard and a half. 'And every one that got away is this big.'"

--Fred Chappell
FredH
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Lake Charles , Louisiana

Posts: 108
FredH on Jan 26, 2011January 26th, 2011, 6:13 am EST
I believe that's the bug. Thanks Martin . Do you know how these guys move in the water and what the standard patterns are?
Jmd123
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Oscoda, MI

Posts: 2474
Jmd123 on Jan 27, 2011January 27th, 2011, 7:15 am EST
There was a recent article in one of the fly fishing magazines about these critters and their imitations. I don't remember which one so I will go look through my stacks tonight and see if I can find it for you.

Jonathon
No matter how big the one you just caught is, there's always a bigger one out there somewhere...
Jmd123
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Oscoda, MI

Posts: 2474
Jmd123 on Jan 28, 2011January 28th, 2011, 1:21 am EST
Found the article - American Angler, January/February 2011, pp. 56-57, entitled "Cressbugs" in the Natural Reflections section of the magazine. It includes an imitation pattern for them too.

I hope this helps!

Jonathon

P.S. Go to www.americanangler.com to find it online.
No matter how big the one you just caught is, there's always a bigger one out there somewhere...
FredH
FredH's profile picture
Lake Charles , Louisiana

Posts: 108
FredH on Jan 28, 2011January 28th, 2011, 2:53 am EST
Thanks Jonathon . I'll let you know what i come up with.
Fred

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