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Lateral view of a Male Baetis (Baetidae) (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Dun from Mystery Creek #43 in New York
Blue-winged Olives
Baetis

Tiny Baetis mayflies are perhaps the most commonly encountered and imitated by anglers on all American trout streams due to their great abundance, widespread distribution, and trout-friendly emergence habits.

Dorsal view of a Holocentropus (Polycentropodidae) Caddisfly Larva from the Yakima River in Washington
This one seems to tentatively key to Holocentropus, although I can't make out the anal spines in Couplet 7 of the Key to Genera of Polycentropodidae Larvae nor the dark bands in Couplet 4 of the Key to Genera of Polycentropodidae Larvae, making me wonder if I went wrong somewhere in keying it out. I don't see where that could have happened, though. It might also be that it's a very immature larva and doesn't possess all the identifying characteristics in the key yet. If Holocentropus is correct, then Holocentropus flavus and Holocentropus interruptus are the two likely possibilities based on range, but I was not able to find a description of their larvae.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
Troutnut is a project started in 2003 by salmonid ecologist Jason "Troutnut" Neuswanger to help anglers and fly tyers unabashedly embrace the entomological side of the sport. Learn more about Troutnut or support the project for an enhanced experience here.

Rgiffin
Auburn, WA

Posts: 5
Rgiffin on Apr 6, 2008April 6th, 2008, 7:57 am EDT
Recipe - Western Green Drake Mayfly Dun

Thread: Olive
Abdomen: 8lb test monofilament wrapped with light olive dubbin
Abdomen overwrap: Pheasant tail fibers, light side up
Ribbing: Danville's gold fine wire
Wing: Slate gray CDC, doubled
Tail: Green dyed Elk fibers
Hackle: Olive, figure-8 tied around the thorax

Note: Western Green Drakes have massive wings and they are splayed for drying as they float on the water. I use the butt ends of the Pheasant tail fibers and pull them back between the wings and then again forward to tie them off.

You can see this pattern at http://www.washingtonflyfishing.com/board/showthread.php?t=40170
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Gif...
Martinlf
Martinlf's profile picture
Moderator
Palmyra PA

Posts: 3047
Martinlf on Apr 6, 2008April 6th, 2008, 12:52 pm EDT
Nice looking fly. Getting the hackle size right underneath seems important along with laying down even wraps to achieve a flat platform. I tied up some flies on umbrella hooks for this year's baetis hatch, then became fixed on another favorite pattern and didn't use much else. My umbrella baetis have abdomens that were tied on a needle, using fibbets, thread, superfine dubbing and flexament, then slipped off when dry and tied to the back of the shank. The technique is called making bug bodiz or something like that--found it on the web. It produces a hollow light abdomen. Durability may be an issue that the mono would help with, though. Please let me know how you do with this fly in terms of hooking and landing fish. I may tie some up for sulphurs too--and try to remember to give them a try.
"He spread them a yard and a half. 'And every one that got away is this big.'"

--Fred Chappell
Rgiffin
Auburn, WA

Posts: 5
Rgiffin on Apr 6, 2008April 6th, 2008, 1:20 pm EDT
Martinlf - I was using thread wraps for the abdomen on by Baetis but I've started plumping it up with olive dubbin and wrapping it with light brown thread.

And I always catch fish with them. I've caught fish on these patterns even without a visible hatch. And the latest change I made - from wrapping hackle around the vertical post to wrapping it figure-8 style on the thorax proved to be the modification that made the float go from a 50% to a 90% ratio. Before, the had the propensity to 'fall over' or just land wrong. Now, they just don't.

I'm primarily a dry-fly fisherman. I consider a day where I wait for the rise to happen, have to sneak up on the rise, present perfectly, and come away with one hard-earned fish a much better day than one spent drowning lead and thread to come away with ten. That's why I like these so much.
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Gif...
Martinlf
Martinlf's profile picture
Moderator
Palmyra PA

Posts: 3047
Martinlf on Apr 6, 2008April 6th, 2008, 2:23 pm EDT
Very interesting. I had thought of the parachute on the bottom as being the best possible selling point for these hooks--getting the footprint of the fly on its legs. So you are using a thorax style hackle, with the hackle cut off on the bottom rather than a parachute underneath? I'm not sure I understand the benefit of the umbrella hook then? Steer me right where I seem to go astray.
"He spread them a yard and a half. 'And every one that got away is this big.'"

--Fred Chappell
Rgiffin
Auburn, WA

Posts: 5
Rgiffin on Apr 6, 2008April 6th, 2008, 2:52 pm EDT
Biggest benefit of the hook is that it acts as a keel, ensuring the fly sits up straight. That little bit of extra weight seems to anchor the fly in the right place in the surface film - and after tying the thorax hackle it works more often than with the post hackle. Not sure why...
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Troutnut
Troutnut's profile picture
Administrator
Bellevue, WA

Posts: 2758
Troutnut on Apr 6, 2008April 6th, 2008, 3:58 pm EDT
Neat pattern. Can you enter that into my fly tying contest on Hacklehead.com? You can win a $50 Orvis gift certificate, and it only takes a minute since you've already got the digital pictures.
Jason Neuswanger, Ph.D.
Troutnut and salmonid ecologist
Rgiffin
Auburn, WA

Posts: 5
Rgiffin on Apr 6, 2008April 6th, 2008, 4:55 pm EDT
Done - thanks for the recommendation.
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Gif...
Troutnut
Troutnut's profile picture
Administrator
Bellevue, WA

Posts: 2758
Troutnut on Apr 6, 2008April 6th, 2008, 5:47 pm EDT
Thanks... good deal!
Jason Neuswanger, Ph.D.
Troutnut and salmonid ecologist
Cozykowal
spokane wa

Posts: 1
Cozykowal on Aug 5, 2010August 5th, 2010, 8:36 am EDT
I just happened onto the website and saw you used umbrella hooks. Can you share where you obtain umbrella hooks? I have tried several sites with no luck. I live in Spokane, but used to live in Auburn for 8 years. Thanks,You can e mail me directly at >healingh20water@gmail.com> the "0" is a zero.
Bob
cozy kowal
Troutfish
Australia

Posts: 2
Troutfish on Sep 26, 2010September 26th, 2010, 10:32 pm EDT
Hi! I'm David Maguire, a researcher from Australia. I am a Trout Fishing enthusiast myself and fishing has been my two sons' fond memories. They complain about waking up early but when they're out there, I could see happy faces :) I'd like to share a site with you that's been very useful to me for answering some of my questions regarding this hobby. It's this link: Trout Fishing Questions
It helped a lot. I hope it does to you too. Great day everyone!
Ditch
Ditch's profile picture
Fuquay-Varina NC

Posts: 36
Ditch on Sep 27, 2010September 27th, 2010, 5:28 am EDT
Troutfish = spammer!!!!!!!!!!!!!
There are no bad fishing days.

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