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Lateral view of a Female Hexagenia limbata (Ephemeridae) (Hex) Mayfly Dun from the Namekagon River in Wisconsin
Hex Mayflies
Hexagenia limbata

The famous nocturnal Hex hatch of the Midwest (and a few other lucky locations) stirs to the surface mythically large brown trout that only touch streamers for the rest of the year.

27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
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Millcreek has attached these 6 pictures. The message is below.
Immature male nymph. Collected March 28,2014.
Immature female nymph. Collected March 29,2014.
Mature male nymph. Collected April 6, 2014.
Mature female nymph. Collected April 6, 2014.
Male nymph beginning to molt. Collected April 6, 2014.
Exuvia left behind after molt. Collected April 6, 2014.
Millcreek
Healdsburg, CA

Posts: 344
Millcreek on Jul 23, 2014July 23rd, 2014, 8:40 pm EDT
Thought some folks might be interested in these photos of Anafroptilum bifurcatum nymphs. They're abundant in the Russian River from mid March until mid June and again from mid July until September. They're usually found in slow water along the edges of glides and riffles. Subimagines usually emerge from early afternoon until early evening. Adults usually show up in the late afternoon or early evening. males congregate in swarms along the edge of gravel bars and females are usually seen flying over fast glides or riffles laying eggs. Mature nymphs are 5-6 mm long (not including cerci).
"If we knew what it was we were doing, it would not be called research, would it?"
-Albert Einstein
Konchu
Konchu's profile picture
Site Editor
Indiana

Posts: 498
Konchu on Jul 24, 2014July 24th, 2014, 6:24 pm EDT
INcredibly nice pictures; thanks!
Millcreek
Healdsburg, CA

Posts: 344
Millcreek on Jul 25, 2014July 25th, 2014, 7:09 am EDT
Luke -

Glad you enjoyed the pictures. I like these little animals but it's always a challenge to get a good photo of them between their size and their tendency to move just about the time you get the focus zeroed in.

Mark
"If we knew what it was we were doing, it would not be called research, would it?"
-Albert Einstein
Entoman
Entoman's profile picture
Northern CA & ID

Posts: 2604
Entoman on Jul 27, 2014July 27th, 2014, 7:27 am EDT
Great pictures, Mark. They look like miniature versions of Ameletus nymphs. I've had good luck with little Sawyer PT's using mallard flank touched up with a marker instead of pheasant tail barbules. The Oliver Edwards style of baetid nymph works great too. On Fall River they can be pretty effective from mid Summer on.
"It's not that I find fishing so important, it's just that I find all other endeavors of Man equally unimportant... And not nearly as much fun!" Robert Traver, Anatomy of a Fisherman
Millcreek
Healdsburg, CA

Posts: 344
Millcreek on Jul 28, 2014July 28th, 2014, 3:40 pm EDT
Kurt - Yeah, they do look like miniature versions of Ameletus. Or at least have some of the same mannerisms and elegant coloration. Always amazes me how the colors don't really show until you get a photo or look at them under a microscope (or maybe they do if you have better eyes than mine).

When I get them in the field they look like little camouflaged specks at first, especially when they're sitting on some sand or gravel. Usually takes me a second to figure what I've got, but those banded cerci give them away pretty quickly.
"If we knew what it was we were doing, it would not be called research, would it?"
-Albert Einstein

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