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Lateral view of a Female Hexagenia limbata (Ephemeridae) (Hex) Mayfly Dun from the Namekagon River in Wisconsin
Hex Mayflies
Hexagenia limbata

The famous nocturnal Hex hatch of the Midwest (and a few other lucky locations) stirs to the surface mythically large brown trout that only touch streamers for the rest of the year.

Lateral view of a Psychodidae True Fly Larva from Mystery Creek #308 in Washington
This wild-looking little thing completely puzzled me. At first I was thinking beetle or month larva, until I got a look at the pictures on the computer screen. I made a couple of incorrect guesses before entomologist Greg Courtney pointed me in the right direction with Psychodidae. He suggested a possible genus of Thornburghiella, but could not rule out some other members of the tribe Pericomini.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
Troutnut is a project started in 2003 by salmonid ecologist Jason "Troutnut" Neuswanger to help anglers and fly tyers unabashedly embrace the entomological side of the sport. Learn more about Troutnut or support the project for an enhanced experience here.

Jmd123 has attached these 5 pictures. The message is below.
"Ready on the left, ready on the right, ready on the firing line, firing line is ready!  Commence firing!"
Kinda cold, wet...glad I had my gun well oiled!
Lemme see here...OK Jonathon, you had five misses...(my target is on the left)
Some fine old military rifles (M1 Garands, mine is the one on the left)
More fine old military rifles, the two on the left are Model of 1917 (.30-06 just like the Garand)
Jmd123
Jmd123's profile picture
Oscoda, MI

Posts: 2474
Jmd123 on Feb 1, 2014February 1st, 2014, 11:49 pm EST
My fly rods haven't seen the light of day in quite a while, October 30th if I remember correct (brain is just now thawing out). We've been pounded by snow, high winds, and arctic temperatures, as probably many of the rest of you have. I've just about gone nuts the past month being cooped up inside staring at snow I can't ski on without getting pneumonia. The lower Au Sable froze again from bank to bank and who knows what the trout streams look like right now, not to mention the accesses...

So what does one do to keep one's sanity at this time of year? Go out and shoot some nice old vintage military rifles in the snow! As titled above, the event is meant to celebrate the battle of the Chosin Reservoir in North Korea, when the US Army and Marines were surrounded by Mao's Red Army and had to fight their way out in even more horrible conditions than we have been putting up with lately...Well, we didn't have the Red Chinese hordes shooting back at us, but it was snowing and around 20F - which felt WARM! Also, no wind, at last...almost balmy. So I packed up the M1 Garand, a bandolier of ammo, my shooting bag, a tarp to lay on, and an OD Army blanket in case the tarp wasn't enough. We each shot at least five sighting rounds (I got to shoot 8) to make sure we were all sighted in, and thirty rounds for score, ten slow-fire prone, ten rapid-fire prone, and ten slow-fire standing offhand (the last was the toughest). I hit the paper 27 times out of thirty - targets were about two feet square with a six-inch bull's-eye. Quite the challenge, and I didn't shoot very well (185 out of 300 possible), but it was a heck of a lot of fun and a great treatment for cabin fever. And I would have knocked off a few bad guys too...

Jonathon
No matter how big the one you just caught is, there's always a bigger one out there somewhere...
Wbranch
Wbranch's profile picture
York & Starlight PA

Posts: 2635
Wbranch on Feb 2, 2014February 2nd, 2014, 3:28 am EST
I think it was quite neat to get out there with your Korean War guns & stuff and go shoot some rounds. I remember my father telling me he was issued a M1 Garand when he was in WW II and he said he had earned a Marksmens badge. I have no idea what that means other than I guess he hit the target well. I kind of remember lifting one when I was a kid and remember they were quite heavy. Do you know the weight?
Catskill fly fisher for fifty-five years.
Jmd123
Jmd123's profile picture
Oscoda, MI

Posts: 2474
Jmd123 on Feb 2, 2014February 2nd, 2014, 5:24 am EST
Matt, according to what I have read, 9.6 lbs. And that feels about right when you lift one. The nice thing about the Garand is that between the weight and the design of the operating mechanism you don't feel much recoil, the rifle muzzle merely jumps and of course you hear a good loud BOOOOOM!

I've got several other nice old military guns and they have vintage rifle shoots at the range here in Oscoda during the summer. Gonna do it this year if I don't get too busy with consulting and teaching (though I want to be because that's where I make my money)...

If you ever find your way out here I will take you to the range and we can burn up a few rounds. Oh, and hit a couple of trout streams as well!

Jonathon
No matter how big the one you just caught is, there's always a bigger one out there somewhere...
PaulRoberts
PaulRoberts's profile picture
Colorado

Posts: 1776
PaulRoberts on Feb 3, 2014February 3rd, 2014, 3:06 pm EST
Yes, the Garand is quite a gun. I shot one only once but was immediately impressed. An amazingly well thought out design that isn't obvious until you shoot it. Big, clunky, even awkward looking I'd always thought. It was heavy in hand, until you put it to your shoulder, and the weight distribution made it point fast, recoil very little, and stay on target. Very impressive rifle. They are a thing of functional beauty in my mind now.
Entoman
Entoman's profile picture
Northern CA & ID

Posts: 2604
Entoman on Feb 5, 2014February 5th, 2014, 9:17 pm EST
Did you guys happen to notice that the lead photo a newbie will see when checking us out is a photo of... vintage military rifles? The next one is cheesecake?

I know it's a bleak Winter and I certainly have nothing against either, but let's not make a habit of this.

If I start seeing photos of coin collections and needlepoint, I'm afraid I won't be able to control the delete button...:)
"It's not that I find fishing so important, it's just that I find all other endeavors of Man equally unimportant... And not nearly as much fun!" Robert Traver, Anatomy of a Fisherman
PaulRoberts
PaulRoberts's profile picture
Colorado

Posts: 1776
PaulRoberts on Feb 6, 2014February 6th, 2014, 2:07 pm EST
Sorry Kurt for my part. I did try to stick the word "trout" in there, or
"invertebrate" (for those lilly-livered pinkos that hang out around here on occasion), even considered "inveterate", but decided to quit while I was behind.
Entoman
Entoman's profile picture
Northern CA & ID

Posts: 2604
Entoman on Feb 6, 2014February 6th, 2014, 9:17 pm EST
:):)
"It's not that I find fishing so important, it's just that I find all other endeavors of Man equally unimportant... And not nearly as much fun!" Robert Traver, Anatomy of a Fisherman

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