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Lateral view of a Male Baetis (Baetidae) (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Dun from Mystery Creek #43 in New York
Blue-winged Olives
Baetis

Tiny Baetis mayflies are perhaps the most commonly encountered and imitated by anglers on all American trout streams due to their great abundance, widespread distribution, and trout-friendly emergence habits.

Dorsal view of a Setvena wahkeena (Perlodidae) (Wahkeena Springfly) Stonefly Nymph from Mystery Creek #199 in Washington
As far as I can tell, this species has only previously been reported from one site in Oregon along the Columbia gorge. However, the key characteristics are fairly unmistakable in all except for one minor detail:
— 4 small yellow spots on frons visible in photos
— Narrow occipital spinule row curves forward (but doesn’t quite meet on stem of ecdysial suture, as it's supposed to in this species)
— Short spinules on anterior margin of front legs
— Short rposterior row of blunt spinules on abdominal tergae, rather than elongated spinules dorsally
I caught several of these mature nymphs in the fishless, tiny headwaters of a creek high in the Wenatchee Mountains.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
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Baron
Baron's profile picture
Pennsylvania

Posts: 16
Baron on Jun 9, 2019June 9th, 2019, 3:16 am EDT
I am new to fly fishing....so new that not even the fish have heard of me yet.
I currently fish some tight areas and hope to get even tighter as the larger streams warm. I'm using a single piece 4 1/2' spinning setup.
I have always admired fly fishing from a distance and there will be allot to learn to get up to speed. My used ebay fly combos arrive next week and will be allot of fun to set-up.
I am wondering if anyone could discuss the advantages of using short fly rods for brushy creeks. So far, in PA, most of the people I've met have said to use a long pole Tenkara style. On the other hand I've seen some Brittish fishermen use 5-6' rods.
Would someone with experience help me understand the nuances of short vs long fly rods in brushy areas?
Baron
Adirman
Adirman's profile picture
Monticello, NY

Posts: 479
Adirman on Jun 9, 2019June 9th, 2019, 8:59 am EDT
Short fly rods are useful for mountain streams and brooks woth a lot of thick bushes streamside for short casts, usually 15’ and less; In fact, a lot of the casts would be bow and arrow type casts. Another advantage logistically is when walking along the bank with thick brush, a shorter rod is easier simply to maneuver thru the tangles. Longer rods are always getting hung up it seems . Hope this helps!

David
Wbranch
Wbranch's profile picture
York & Starlight PA

Posts: 2635
Wbranch on Jun 9, 2019June 9th, 2019, 9:20 am EDT
Davis has offered all the information I would have provided. A 5' or 6' fly rod is going to be much easier to travel through the brush with and fish than a longer 8' - 9' rod.
Catskill fly fisher for fifty-five years.
Baron
Baron's profile picture
Pennsylvania

Posts: 16
Baron on Jun 9, 2019June 9th, 2019, 2:19 pm EDT
Thanks for the comments. If I were purchase one for casts under 25’ and for fish less than one pound and for use in brushy areas how should it be rigged? What weights? I’m thinking 2/3 rod and reel with 3 line? Light action?
Baron
Wbranch
Wbranch's profile picture
York & Starlight PA

Posts: 2635
Wbranch on Jun 9, 2019June 9th, 2019, 2:28 pm EDT
If all you plan to ever fish is those little streams of no more than 15' wide than a #3 will probably work okay. I consider any line under a #3 to be a novelty line and of little real fly fishing value. That's my opinion and I'm old enough, and good enough, to make broad statements about fly fishing tackle.
Catskill fly fisher for fifty-five years.
Baron
Baron's profile picture
Pennsylvania

Posts: 16
Baron on Jun 10, 2019June 10th, 2019, 2:52 am EDT
WBRANCH I hear ya. I got a couple rigs off the internet to get me started. They range from 4-6 weight and that should do wellfrom Martins creek trout to the Delaware Smallies. The rods are 7.5’ and two that are 8’. The reels are orvis WYE, true temper, and Caddis creek. All of older vintage. Time and experience will dictate what new equipment choices I’ll make.
Baron

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