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Lateral view of a Male Baetis (Baetidae) (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Dun from Mystery Creek #43 in New York
Blue-winged Olives
Baetis

Tiny Baetis mayflies are perhaps the most commonly encountered and imitated by anglers on all American trout streams due to their great abundance, widespread distribution, and trout-friendly emergence habits.

Lateral view of a Clostoeca disjuncta (Limnephilidae) (Northern Caddisfly) Caddisfly Larva from the Yakima River in Washington
This one was surprisingly straightforward to identify. The lack of a sclerite at the base of the lateral hump narrows the field quite a bit, and the other options followed fairly obvious characteristics to Clostoeca, which only has one species, Clostoeca disjuncta.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
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This topic is about the Mayfly Species Baetis flavistriga

This is one of the most widespread and abundant Baetis species, and it may produce fishable hatches under a variety of conditions.

This species is known in angling books by several old synonyms, including Baetis quebecensus, Baetis levitans, Baetis cingulatus, and Baetis phoebus, in addition to the correct name.

Example specimens

CaseyP
CaseyP's profile picture
Arlington, VA/ Mercersburg, PA

Posts: 653
CaseyP on Jan 22, 2007January 22nd, 2007, 12:43 pm EST

pleased to report the emergence of a new baetis flavistriga which i have christened computatii

forum visitors using the Firefox browser who put troutnut.com on their bookmarks toolbar have undoubtedly noticed a tiny dark mayfly icon in a blue box next the bookmark.

well, it's breeding. came back this evening from a week out of town to discover that the little troutnut computatii had a pal over next the hotmail.com bookmark where formerly there was only a generic white icon. am waiting for it to show up next the other two sites that have only generic icons.

now our resident boffins will help me with the Latin ending on the new name, (i tried to use the genitive plural) and then we'll ask Jason how he got these virtual flies to multiply.

Casey
"You can observe a lot by watching." Yogi Berra
Taxon
Taxon's profile picture
Site Editor
Plano, TX

Posts: 1311
Taxon on Jan 22, 2007January 22nd, 2007, 4:00 pm EST
Casey-

Hmmm. When I add a Bookmark for Troutnut.com to the Bookmark Toolbar on my Mozilla Firefox 1.5.0.9 browser, the favicon I get looks like this:
Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
Troutnut
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Administrator
Bellevue, WA

Posts: 2758
Troutnut on Jan 23, 2007January 23rd, 2007, 1:52 am EST
Some sites have them, some don't... they're very particular about their habitat requirements. :)
Jason Neuswanger, Ph.D.
Troutnut and salmonid ecologist
Martinlf
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Moderator
Palmyra PA

Posts: 3047
Martinlf on Jan 23, 2007January 23rd, 2007, 3:13 am EST
I get the mayfly icon using Mozilla here at home :) , but not when I log on with IE at work. :(
"He spread them a yard and a half. 'And every one that got away is this big.'"

--Fred Chappell
Troutnut
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Administrator
Bellevue, WA

Posts: 2758
Troutnut on Jan 23, 2007January 23rd, 2007, 6:19 am EST
The poor support for "favicons" in Internet Explorer 6 is kind of annoying. The icon will show up in your bookmarks menu if you bookmark the page, but it won't show up in the address bar unless you have the exact address of the current page bookmarked. (For example, even if you have the homepage of Troutnut.com bookmarked, you won't see the icon in the address bar from this forum page -- only from the homepage.)

Of course, using Firefox solves all these problems. :)
Jason Neuswanger, Ph.D.
Troutnut and salmonid ecologist
Taxon
Taxon's profile picture
Site Editor
Plano, TX

Posts: 1311
Taxon on Jan 18, 2009January 18th, 2009, 1:10 pm EST
Casey-

Can't help you with the bookmark icon, but several years ago when I asked Dr. McCafferty how to pronounce the ii ending on packii, I believe he said it was pronounced pack-ee-eye, whereas packi would be pack-eye.
Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
JAD
JAD's profile picture
Alexandria Pa

Posts: 362
JAD on Jan 19, 2009January 19th, 2009, 2:58 am EST
You might want to check this out Roger---It is pronounced pack-ee-eye in Australin and some of the speakers in the US-- on this helper---http://www.oddcast.com/home/demos/tts/tts_example.php?sitepal --- this is a pretty neat helper I use.

JAD

They fasten red (crimson red) wool around a hook, and fix onto the wool two feathers which grow under a cock’s wattles, and which in colour are like wax.
Radcliffe's Fishing from the Earliest Times,
Taxon
Taxon's profile picture
Site Editor
Plano, TX

Posts: 1311
Taxon on Jan 19, 2009January 19th, 2009, 4:40 am EST
John-

Cute. Just wish one (of the menu choices) was "English speaking version of Latinized Greek used for scientific names."

Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com

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