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Artistic view of a Male Pteronarcys californica (Pteronarcyidae) (Giant Salmonfly) Stonefly Adult from the Gallatin River in Montana
Salmonflies
Pteronarcys californica

The giant Salmonflies of the Western mountains are legendary for their proclivity to elicit consistent dry-fly action and ferocious strikes.

Dorsal view of a Zapada cinctipes (Nemouridae) (Tiny Winter Black) Stonefly Nymph from the Yakima River in Washington
Nymphs of this species were fairly common in late-winter kick net samples from the upper Yakima River. Although I could not find a key to species of Zapada nymphs, a revision of the Nemouridae family by Baumann (1975) includes the following helpful sentence: "2 cervical gills on each side of midline, 1 arising inside and 1 outside of lateral cervical sclerites, usually single and elongate, sometimes constricted but with 3 or 4 branches arising beyond gill base in Zapada cinctipes." This specimen clearly has the branches and is within the range of that species.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
Troutnut is a project started in 2003 by salmonid ecologist Jason "Troutnut" Neuswanger to help anglers and fly tyers unabashedly embrace the entomological side of the sport. Learn more about Troutnut or support the project for an enhanced experience here.

Getyourbone
Baldwin, WI

Posts: 28
Getyourbone on Apr 26, 2008April 26th, 2008, 12:01 pm EDT
I haven't had a chance to see if the trout like it but I did try it out yesterday in muddy water and it seemed to float fine.

Anyone have experience with tying this way?
(my camera is 6-8 years old so the quality of the photo isn't the best. I have to take the blame for the quality if the tying though.


Martinlf
Martinlf's profile picture
Moderator
Palmyra PA

Posts: 3047
Martinlf on Apr 26, 2008April 26th, 2008, 1:39 pm EDT
I've tied and fished various upside down flies over the years. The wing must be flexible enough and/or the hook gapped wide enough to hook fish. They work just fine in terms of fish rising to them. Your fly looks good in terms of silhouette; it should be plenty of attractive to the fish. Let us know how it works.
"He spread them a yard and a half. 'And every one that got away is this big.'"

--Fred Chappell
JAD
JAD's profile picture
Alexandria Pa

Posts: 362
JAD on Apr 28, 2008April 28th, 2008, 1:39 am EDT
Nice looking fly ,I think it will work. I'll take a dozen to experiment with in Pa,in sulfur yellow to try in a couple of weeks:)

JaD

They fasten red (crimson red) wool around a hook, and fix onto the wool two feathers which grow under a cock’s wattles, and which in colour are like wax.
Radcliffe's Fishing from the Earliest Times,
Trtklr
Banned
Michigan

Posts: 115
Trtklr on Jun 5, 2008June 5th, 2008, 8:41 am EDT
I've tied these type of flies and they work just fine for me. Be mindful of the bend of the hook on the second photo it looks like your getting too far down on the bend. your can see it in the tail.
I have seen nothing more beautiful than the sunrise on a cold stream.
Vermonter
Posts: 15
Vermonter on Jun 5, 2008June 5th, 2008, 1:55 pm EDT
waterwisp.com
Excellent product! Has worked well for me.
RoyChristie
London UK

Posts: 10
RoyChristie on Aug 25, 2008August 25th, 2008, 2:12 pm EDT
Hi, GYB, the design is nearly there,
As mentioned, keep the wing as flexible as possible, I use woodduck fibers, about 12 - 15 fibers, so the wing does not obstruct hook-ups. Tails should be flexible, those on your fly aare fine.
The difference I put into my tying of the USD is that I use the thorax cover method of splitting the hackle; then when the fly is completed and the lacquer on the thorax cover (pheasant tail cover) is dried, run the haackle fibers over your fingernail to make them bend up toward the wing.
This way the hackle barbs do not penetrate the surface and the fly floats totally dry.
Do not clip out any fibers which stick out over the hook eye, these stop the fly from tipping onto its nose.
You have a good design there; keep the wing slim.
What hook is that on your fly?

Here is one of my EasyPeasy USD duns..




ok, make it two...



Taxon
Taxon's profile picture
Site Editor
Plano, TX

Posts: 1311
Taxon on Aug 25, 2008August 25th, 2008, 2:32 pm EDT
Hi Roy,

Just use the scissors icon to modify your post, and change each of the four instance of IMG to all lower case, and you'll be good to go.
Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
RoyChristie
London UK

Posts: 10
RoyChristie on Aug 25, 2008August 25th, 2008, 2:35 pm EDT
Thanks, Roger, sleepytime for me.

later,
Roy
Softhackle
Softhackle's profile picture
Wellsville, NY

Posts: 540
Softhackle on Aug 26, 2008August 26th, 2008, 3:06 pm EDT
I must tell you, Roy is probably one of the best tiers of upside-down, backwards flies I've ever seen. I also consider him very innovative in tying and a very good friend. Yes, Roy, I'm here, too.

Mark

To see more of Roy's great flies go here:

http://www.danica.com/flytier/rchristie/rchristie.htm
"I have the highest respect for the skilled wet-fly fisherman, as he has mastered an art of very great difficulty." Edward R. Hewitt

Flymphs, Soft-hackles and Spiders: http://www.troutnut.com/libstudio/FS&S/index.html
RoyChristie
London UK

Posts: 10
RoyChristie on Aug 27, 2008August 27th, 2008, 7:55 am EDT
hi, Mark

thanks for the good refs, mate

Roy

:)
Trtklr
Banned
Michigan

Posts: 115
Trtklr on Sep 3, 2008September 3rd, 2008, 3:44 am EDT
its funny this thread got revisited because I was just thinking about it this last week. has anyone ever tied their mayflies backwards. tail coming off the eyelet and hackle by the bend. it seems like it would work great for drifting downstream, someone told me a mayfly won't float backwards down a stream.
I have seen nothing more beautiful than the sunrise on a cold stream.
Martinlf
Martinlf's profile picture
Moderator
Palmyra PA

Posts: 3047
Martinlf on Sep 3, 2008September 3rd, 2008, 10:44 am EDT
I tie some spinners this way, especially Trico parachutes, and a few duns, also parachutes, as well as Waterwisp flies. It makes sense to me.
"He spread them a yard and a half. 'And every one that got away is this big.'"

--Fred Chappell
Shawnny3
Moderator
Pleasant Gap, PA

Posts: 1197
Shawnny3 on Sep 3, 2008September 3rd, 2008, 11:54 am EDT
Do you notice any significant differences in the performance of the backward versus the forward style, Louis?

-Shawn
Jewelry-Quality Artistic Salmon Flies, by Shawn Davis
www.davisflydesigns.com
Softhackle
Softhackle's profile picture
Wellsville, NY

Posts: 540
Softhackle on Sep 3, 2008September 3rd, 2008, 2:42 pm EDT
Trtklr,
Roy Christie ties them backwards, and upside-down. Look at some of his flies on the link I posted earlier in the thread. Roy says that flies tied like this work better because the way the fly floats, it holds/pushes the leader underwater. (Notice they are tied on an up eye hook.)

Look here, too:
http://www.sexyloops.com/articles/troutflydesign2.shtml

I find this idea intriguing. It makes a lot of sense.

Louis, how do you tie yours? Where is the wing placed, hackle, etc.?

Mark
"I have the highest respect for the skilled wet-fly fisherman, as he has mastered an art of very great difficulty." Edward R. Hewitt

Flymphs, Soft-hackles and Spiders: http://www.troutnut.com/libstudio/FS&S/index.html
Martinlf
Martinlf's profile picture
Moderator
Palmyra PA

Posts: 3047
Martinlf on Sep 3, 2008September 3rd, 2008, 3:19 pm EDT
Mark, I tie my reverse parachute Tricos by putting a post just over the hook point, or a bit back toward the bend, and I tie them right side up. I think I have full directions in the Trico thread that was active a while back. I don't use tails, and the tippet floats on the surface, unlike Roy's. I've heard that sinking the tippet is best with picky fish, though, and I like Roy's flies.
"He spread them a yard and a half. 'And every one that got away is this big.'"

--Fred Chappell
Softhackle
Softhackle's profile picture
Wellsville, NY

Posts: 540
Softhackle on Sep 4, 2008September 4th, 2008, 11:42 am EDT
Thanks, Louis.

Mark
"I have the highest respect for the skilled wet-fly fisherman, as he has mastered an art of very great difficulty." Edward R. Hewitt

Flymphs, Soft-hackles and Spiders: http://www.troutnut.com/libstudio/FS&S/index.html
Trtklr
Banned
Michigan

Posts: 115
Trtklr on Sep 4, 2008September 4th, 2008, 1:01 pm EDT
talking about tippet floating or in the water makes me think of a book I was reading that talked of putting floatant on the tippet up about 10". this would make the tippet loop in the air as it came off the fly. thats the only way I did it when I started fly fishing. it does work, the loop I mean. there is about 4" of line that bows up in the air.
I have seen nothing more beautiful than the sunrise on a cold stream.

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