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Artistic view of a Male Pteronarcys californica (Pteronarcyidae) (Giant Salmonfly) Stonefly Adult from the Gallatin River in Montana
Salmonflies
Pteronarcys californica

The giant Salmonflies of the Western mountains are legendary for their proclivity to elicit consistent dry-fly action and ferocious strikes.

Dorsal view of a Zapada cinctipes (Nemouridae) (Tiny Winter Black) Stonefly Nymph from the Yakima River in Washington
Nymphs of this species were fairly common in late-winter kick net samples from the upper Yakima River. Although I could not find a key to species of Zapada nymphs, a revision of the Nemouridae family by Baumann (1975) includes the following helpful sentence: "2 cervical gills on each side of midline, 1 arising inside and 1 outside of lateral cervical sclerites, usually single and elongate, sometimes constricted but with 3 or 4 branches arising beyond gill base in Zapada cinctipes." This specimen clearly has the branches and is within the range of that species.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
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Lateral view of a Male Baetis (Baetidae) (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Dun from Mystery Creek #43 in New York
This dun molted most of the way into a spinner (though the wings got stuck) the evening after I photographed it, so I took some more photos of the spinner.

I found a female nearby, probably of the same species.
Entoman
Entoman's profile picture
Northern CA & ID

Posts: 2604
Entoman on Oct 25, 2011October 25th, 2011, 11:39 am EDT
Hi Jason,

Excepting Bob Newell's nymphs, I believe the photos on the Acerpenna genus hatch page are actually Baetis. Looking closely at the images shows characters hard to reconcile with Merritt IV couplet 37(36') for Acerpenna that reads in part as follows, "...beyond costal process anterior margin of hind wing undulate; terminal segment of male forceps approximately four times as long as wide..."

The specimens do match up with Baetis by the process of elimination as the preceding couplets and those that follow rule out other possibilities by negative determination. The characters of baetis are so variable that the keys have to be structured this way, I guess.

Regards,

Kurt
"It's not that I find fishing so important, it's just that I find all other endeavors of Man equally unimportant... And not nearly as much fun!" Robert Traver, Anatomy of a Fisherman

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