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Artistic view of a Male Pteronarcys californica (Pteronarcyidae) (Giant Salmonfly) Stonefly Adult from the Gallatin River in Montana
Salmonflies
Pteronarcys californica

The giant Salmonflies of the Western mountains are legendary for their proclivity to elicit consistent dry-fly action and ferocious strikes.

Lateral view of a Onocosmoecus (Limnephilidae) (Great Late-Summer Sedge) Caddisfly Larva from the Yakima River in Washington
This specimen keys pretty easily to Onocosmoecus, and it closely resembles a specimen from Alaska which caddis expert Dave Ruiter recognized as this genus. As with that specimen, the only species in the genus documented in this area is Onocosmoecus unicolor, but Dave suggested for that specimen that there might be multiple not-yet-distinguished species under the unicolor umbrella and it would be best to stick with the genus-level ID. I'm doing the same for this one.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
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Isidro
Posts: 24
Isidro on Mar 3, 2008March 3rd, 2008, 7:31 am EST
Hello everyone! I'm new here. I'm not a fisher but I like photograph insects. As in mayflies (Ephemeroptera) there are any accessible specialist, I'm very happy for have found this site.

Well, I will put here some mayfly, stonefly and caddishfly pictures that I have without identification. The first is this one, that I suppose Baetidae. No posterior wings, two cerci, about 20-23 mm wingspan, the venation is simple. In a village in continental mediterranean climate, at Borja, Aragon, NE Spain.



I would be very happy if I can identify my mayflies...

Many tyanks!!!

P.D. Excuse my poor English :-(

P.P.D. I have the list of all Iberian Peninsula mayflies, if it's useful for identification
Konchu
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Indiana

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Konchu on Mar 3, 2008March 3rd, 2008, 8:48 am EST
Which Acentrella (fam. Baetidae) do you have on your list?
Taxon
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Taxon on Mar 3, 2008March 3rd, 2008, 3:58 pm EST
Konchu-

I'm thinking either Alainites muticus or Nigrobaëtis niger. See this link. Based on the stated wingspan, I am guessing the body length to be about 9 mm, and I believe that would be well outside the length range for Acentrella. Unfortunately, Spain's mayflies don't seem to be in the European Macro-Invertebrate Database, so I'm a bit handicapped there, but I'm pretty sure Alainites muticus is represented in Spain.
Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
Isidro
Posts: 24
Isidro on Mar 3, 2008March 3rd, 2008, 6:49 pm EST
Many thanks Konchu and Taxon. It's a pity the thing said by Taxon, and happens with all types of insects: Europe ends in the Pyrenees!

Well, the only Acentrella species in Spain is Acentrella sinaica, because the other Spanish species, Acentrella almohades, was discovered in 1999 and is very difficult that I've found a new species ;-)

Alainites in Spain are represented by Alainites muticus and Alainites navasi. Nigrobaetis, are represented by Nigrobaetis niger and Nigrobaetis digitatus.

I forget to said, that this mayfly was photographed in March. (2007)
Konchu
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Konchu on Mar 4, 2008March 4th, 2008, 4:46 am EST
Size probably rules out the acentrella; I missed that detail when glancing over the page. Good call Taxon. To be honest, I am not so familiar with European baetidae, so your guess is as good as mine. Just for conversation: Are there some Pseudocloeon/Labiobaetis that might qualify?
Taxon
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Taxon on Mar 4, 2008March 4th, 2008, 10:02 am EST
Konchu-

As mentioned earlier, Spanish mayflies are not in the European Macro-Invertebrate Database, even though mayflies from adjacent Portugal are. So, the best I can do is list the Portugal Baetids:

BAETIDAE
BAETINAE
Alainites muticus
Alainites navasi
Baetis alpinus
Baetis buceratus
Baetis estrelensis
Baetis fuscatus
Baetis lutheri
Baetis melanonyx
Baetis nigrescens
Baetis pavidus
Baetis rhodani
Baetis scambus
Baetis vardarensis
Labiobaetis atrebatinus

CLOEONINAE
Centroptilum luteolum
Cloeon dipterum
Cloeon schoenemundi
Cloeon simile
Procloeon concinnum
Procloeon pennulatum
Procloeon pulchrum
Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
Konchu
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Konchu on Mar 4, 2008March 4th, 2008, 2:58 pm EST
Off the top of my head, I can think of a paper from about 25 years ago that dealt with the mayflies of the Iberian Peninsula, but I am not aware of where to find a copy for distribution. Is this the paper that you mention in your PPD, Isidro?
Isidro
Posts: 24
Isidro on Mar 4, 2008March 4th, 2008, 7:20 pm EST
No, Konchu, the list that I've mentioned is a part of Fauna Iberica, a project of classify all animals of Iberian Peninsula. There are good books and many of the animal groups are published already, and in Internet we can find the list of species -without taxon details -. Here is the list of Iberian Baetidae:

http://www.fauna-iberica.mncn.csic.es/faunaib/arthropoda/insecta/ephemeroptera/baetidae.php

We could give finally an identification...?
Isidro
Posts: 24
Isidro on Mar 10, 2008March 10th, 2008, 3:53 am EDT
Anybody.... ? :-(
Isidro
Posts: 24
Isidro on Mar 16, 2008March 16th, 2008, 6:23 am EDT
I give it as impossible..??? :-( :-( :-(
Taxon
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Taxon on Mar 16, 2008March 16th, 2008, 8:04 am EDT
Isidro-

With mayflies, specific identification generally requires microscopic examination of a male imago, and perhaps even dissection. Granted, we often engage in speculation, but this usually regards N. American species with which we are much more familiar. If anyone on this forum had been able give you additional information, I expect he or she would have already have done so. However, I certainly hope you will continue to post photos of your European species, as I (for one) find them extremely interesting, and hope to learn more about them.
Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
Konchu
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Konchu on Mar 16, 2008March 16th, 2008, 11:35 am EDT
Taxon: Thanks for mentioning those databases. They were most helpful to help with a small task I am undertaking...
Taxon
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Taxon on Mar 16, 2008March 16th, 2008, 12:05 pm EDT
Konchu-

You're welcome. Glad to be of some help.
Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
DGA
Milan - Italy

Posts: 1
DGA on May 5, 2008May 5th, 2008, 5:43 am EDT
Hi,
I'm a freshwater biologist working on mayfly (but I'm not a taxonomist at all..),
reading the thread I thought I could suggest you two useful links.
At http://www.faunaeur.org/ you can find a pan European database of land and freshwater animals, you can for instance easily get a list of all the European mayfly species occurring i.e. in Spain or Italy (is updated at 2004)..
Another useful link concerning mayfly is http://www.famu.org/mayfly/mfbib.php where you can find the most complete bibliographic list freely available on line with also some pdf files to download,
hope you'll find them useful,
regards,
David Armanini
Isidro
Posts: 24
Isidro on May 5, 2008May 5th, 2008, 5:50 am EDT
Thanks David, I know very well Fauna Europaea and I use it very often. But in Ephemeroptera I prefair use the more concrete list of Fauna Iberica, that shows all the species of Ephemeroptera in muy country and in Portugal. The link is posted some messages before for Baetidae family. The complete Ephemeroptera list is here:

http://www.fauna-iberica.mncn.csic.es/faunaib/arthropoda/insecta/ephemeroptera/index.php
And
Europe

Posts: 14
And on Jun 4, 2008June 4th, 2008, 10:51 am EDT
Hello Isidro,

in my knowledge, there are 2 genera in Europe that happen to have no posterior wing: cleon and procleon

However in some other Baetidae the posterior wing can be very small and difficult to spot without some magnification

Andrea
And
Europe

Posts: 14
And on Jun 4, 2008June 4th, 2008, 10:51 am EDT
Hello Isidro,

in my knowledge, there are 2 genera in Europe that happen to have no posterior wing: cleon and procleon

However in some other Baetidae the posterior wing can be very small and difficult to spot without some magnification

Andrea

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