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Artistic view of a Male Pteronarcys californica (Pteronarcyidae) (Giant Salmonfly) Stonefly Adult from the Gallatin River in Montana
Salmonflies
Pteronarcys californica

The giant Salmonflies of the Western mountains are legendary for their proclivity to elicit consistent dry-fly action and ferocious strikes.

Dorsal view of a Pycnopsyche guttifera (Limnephilidae) (Great Autumn Brown Sedge) Caddisfly Larva from the Yakima River in Washington
This specimen appears to be of the same species as this one collected in the same spot two months earlier. The identification of both is tentative. This one suffered some physical damage before being photographed, too, so the colors aren't totally natural. I was mostly photographing it to test out some new camera setting idea, which worked really well for a couple of closeups.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
Troutnut is a project started in 2003 by salmonid ecologist Jason "Troutnut" Neuswanger to help anglers and fly tyers unabashedly embrace the entomological side of the sport. Learn more about Troutnut or support the project for an enhanced experience here.

Quagmireage has attached this picture to aid in identification. The message is below.
Quagmireage
Somerset, PA

Posts: 4
Quagmireage on Mar 28, 2019March 28th, 2019, 6:46 am EDT
Hi folks.
I found this nymph in the Keystone Select section of Laurel Hill Creek, Somerset county PA. It's really small(20-24, maybe smaller). Sorry to be so vague. If anyone has an idea what it might be, I'd love to know.


Thanks!
Millcreek
Healdsburg, CA

Posts: 344
Millcreek on Mar 29, 2019March 29th, 2019, 1:14 pm EDT
Clark - I'm pretty sure this is a member of the Baetidae family. As to the genus your guess is as good as mine. You'll need to dissect the mouth parts to figure out genus.
"If we knew what it was we were doing, it would not be called research, would it?"
-Albert Einstein
Quagmireage
Somerset, PA

Posts: 4
Quagmireage on Mar 29, 2019March 29th, 2019, 1:25 pm EDT
Thanks.
Millcreek
Healdsburg, CA

Posts: 344
Millcreek on Mar 29, 2019March 29th, 2019, 1:42 pm EDT
The more I look at it the more it looks like it might be an early instar of Baetis tricaudatus. Google it and see what you think.
"If we knew what it was we were doing, it would not be called research, would it?"
-Albert Einstein
Konchu
Konchu's profile picture
Site Editor
Indiana

Posts: 498
Konchu on Apr 3, 2019April 3rd, 2019, 4:44 am EDT
If the tails are banded, rather than a solid color, then this probably is either Baetis flavistriga or something close. The markings on the abdominal terga also remind me much more of flavistriga than tricaudatus.

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