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Artistic view of a Male Pteronarcys californica (Pteronarcyidae) (Giant Salmonfly) Stonefly Adult from the Gallatin River in Montana
Salmonflies
Pteronarcys californica

The giant Salmonflies of the Western mountains are legendary for their proclivity to elicit consistent dry-fly action and ferocious strikes.

Lateral view of a Psychodidae True Fly Larva from Mystery Creek #308 in Washington
This wild-looking little thing completely puzzled me. At first I was thinking beetle or month larva, until I got a look at the pictures on the computer screen. I made a couple of incorrect guesses before entomologist Greg Courtney pointed me in the right direction with Psychodidae. He suggested a possible genus of Thornburghiella, but could not rule out some other members of the tribe Pericomini.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
Troutnut is a project started in 2003 by salmonid ecologist Jason "Troutnut" Neuswanger to help anglers and fly tyers unabashedly embrace the entomological side of the sport. Learn more about Troutnut or support the project for an enhanced experience here.

LittleJ
Hollidaysburg Pa

Posts: 251
LittleJ on Jul 6, 2008July 6th, 2008, 12:18 pm EDT
I just thought that it would be interesting now that it is finally over (I fished penns,spruce and little J this weekend so I can officially call it over) in central pa to hear everyone's thoughts on the months events. I personally may have caught more fish in the month of june than I have in some years. My pattern was pretty simple tmc 8089 hook, rust orange antron body, black foam over back, copper and pearl flash for wings. The best part may have been fishing for an entire month w/o a vest or even a fly box. I would show up w/ a 1/2 dozen flys stuck to my wader straps and a spool of 1x. W/O question the most fun I've ever had with a dry fly. Although I must say today did produce similar results w/a stimulator and crane fly larva.
jeff
JAD
JAD's profile picture
Alexandria Pa

Posts: 362
JAD on Jul 6, 2008July 6th, 2008, 1:46 pm EDT
I share the same feelings, I told Louis it took me 55 years but I finally got even with those Trout :)

JaD
Aka- Caddisman1

They fasten red (crimson red) wool around a hook, and fix onto the wool two feathers which grow under a cock’s wattles, and which in colour are like wax.
Radcliffe's Fishing from the Earliest Times,
Liljrob
ebensburg,pa

Posts: 4
Liljrob on Jul 6, 2008July 6th, 2008, 5:46 pm EDT
I also experienced the cicada hatch on the little junitata. I was fortunate enough to witness friends catch several fish in the 18 plus inch range with a pattern similair to yours. with the highlight being a 21 inch rainbow caught in the gorge by my cousin.(is it just me or do the few rainbows in the little j seem to love these cicada's even more than the browns?)
JAD
JAD's profile picture
Alexandria Pa

Posts: 362
JAD on Jul 7, 2008July 7th, 2008, 3:28 am EDT


Liljrob ----I'm nether a brown or a rainbow and I love them.

JaD

They fasten red (crimson red) wool around a hook, and fix onto the wool two feathers which grow under a cock’s wattles, and which in colour are like wax.
Radcliffe's Fishing from the Earliest Times,
CaseyP
CaseyP's profile picture
Arlington, VA/ Mercersburg, PA

Posts: 653
CaseyP on Jul 7, 2008July 7th, 2008, 3:40 am EDT
it's going to be a very long time before this tyro forgets those monster fish. and the big splashy strikes. and the big, easily removed hooks. perhaps it is a good thing that cicadas only come every 17 years, but i feel like the kid whose mother said that if Christmas came every month we'd not appreciate it half as much.

"You can observe a lot by watching." Yogi Berra
Martinlf
Martinlf's profile picture
Moderator
Palmyra PA

Posts: 3047
Martinlf on Jul 7, 2008July 7th, 2008, 6:26 am EDT
Ditto to the remarks above. I had a blast. Next up on my plate is Trico fishing. What a switch!
"He spread them a yard and a half. 'And every one that got away is this big.'"

--Fred Chappell
Lastchance
Portage, PA

Posts: 437
Lastchance on Jul 7, 2008July 7th, 2008, 12:16 pm EDT
I, too, had a great time fishing the cicadas. It certainly brought up the big fish, although my biggest catch was a 16-incher. I missed some big ones and broke a few off before I realized 3x wasn't going to cut it. I saw a few landed in the 20 inch and over range. My biggest thrill was watching my buddy's wife hook and land fish. She had a blast we enjoyed every moment of it.
The best
Jjlyon01
SUNY Environmental Science and Forestry, Syracuse

Posts: 71
Jjlyon01 on Jul 7, 2008July 7th, 2008, 1:36 pm EDT
Although I missed out on the cicada hatch that everyone up north got to enjoy, the hatch sounds like a book I read last semester, The Snowfly, its a great book to read. Its a fiction book but I think some of you may like it. I wish I could remember the author, sorry.
"I now walk into the wild"
Martinlf
Martinlf's profile picture
Moderator
Palmyra PA

Posts: 3047
Martinlf on Jul 8, 2008July 8th, 2008, 5:02 am EDT
Those not in PA may wish to look on some of the cicada websites. The hatch may be in your neck of the woods in a coming year, and it's certainly worth a bit of travel.
"He spread them a yard and a half. 'And every one that got away is this big.'"

--Fred Chappell
Catharsis
Media, PA

Posts: 5
Catharsis on Jul 18, 2008July 18th, 2008, 5:35 am EDT
Fairly new to trout fishing having caught my first "stockie" on opening day in 2007 but now Im addicted and have been putting in some serious steam time and chasing natives. anyway we got up to the Little J at the end of June and I had a great time. First day out we were skunked fishing above the quarry (some smallies though). Some local at our campsite turned us on to another fishery with plenty of cold water feeders and we spent the next two days fishing there. IM not sure if the fact that the river didnt see near as much pressure as the Little J or the stars were better aligned, but I was rather pleased with landing 9 nice fish on the second day all over 15" with the largest being an 18" brown. After lunch and a fall down the rock embankment the fish were much harder to get either because the overcast melted away or we put them down. We didnt move much and probably could have went in search of more "virgin water", but being new to the area felt we had a good spot.
A limted 1 1/2 hr in the morning of the third day before our 4 hour ride home yielded a couple more nice rainbows.

Best dry fly experience to date and all caught on my own flys.
"Although I know much, I should like to know all" - Goethe

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