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Artistic view of a Male Pteronarcys californica (Pteronarcyidae) (Giant Salmonfly) Stonefly Adult from the Gallatin River in Montana
Salmonflies
Pteronarcys californica

The giant Salmonflies of the Western mountains are legendary for their proclivity to elicit consistent dry-fly action and ferocious strikes.

Dorsal view of a Epeorus albertae (Heptageniidae) (Pink Lady) Mayfly Nymph from the East Fork Issaquah Creek in Washington
This specimen keys to the Epeorus albertae group of species. Of the five species in that group, the two known in Washington state are Epeorus albertae and Epeorus dulciana. Of the two, albertae has been collected in vastly more locations in Washington than dulciana, suggesting it is far more common. On that basis alone I'm tentatively putting this nymph in albertae, with the large caveat that there's no real information to rule out dulciana.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
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Wbranch
Wbranch's profile picture
York & Starlight PA

Posts: 2635
Wbranch on May 17, 2009May 17th, 2009, 1:28 am EDT
Catskill fly fisher for fifty-five years.
GONZO
Site Editor
"Bear Swamp," PA

Posts: 1681
GONZO on May 17, 2009May 17th, 2009, 8:43 am EDT
Matt,

Others can advise you about access and conditions much better than I can. I understand that the Little J does have March Browns. They should be emerging now. As is the case on many Eastern waters, that hatch is often sparse rather than concentrated and often extends into early June. The "sulphur" that should also be emerging is invaria. On most PA trout streams that have them, the dorothea hatch typically begins later (toward the end of the month). Although I'm not at all sure that "true" dorothea occur on the J, perhaps there are some. Many of the smaller, later sulphurs that are often attributed to dorothea are continuations of the invaria hatch. In areas with extended hatches of invaria, they become smaller and somewhat lighter in color as the hatch continues. However, that taxonomic distinction makes only very slight differences from a fishing standpoint, and probably is only of interest to nitpickers (like me). :)
Wbranch
Wbranch's profile picture
York & Starlight PA

Posts: 2635
Wbranch on May 17, 2009May 17th, 2009, 8:50 am EDT
Catskill fly fisher for fifty-five years.
GONZO
Site Editor
"Bear Swamp," PA

Posts: 1681
GONZO on May 17, 2009May 17th, 2009, 8:51 am EDT
I suspected that would be the case--enjoy! (And report back after your visit.)

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