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Lateral view of a Male Baetis (Baetidae) (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Dun from Mystery Creek #43 in New York
Blue-winged Olives
Baetis

Tiny Baetis mayflies are perhaps the most commonly encountered and imitated by anglers on all American trout streams due to their great abundance, widespread distribution, and trout-friendly emergence habits.

Dorsal view of a Grammotaulius betteni (Limnephilidae) (Northern Caddisfly) Caddisfly Larva from the Yakima River in Washington
This is a striking caddis larva with an interesting color pattern on the head. Here are some characteristics I was able to see under the microscope, but could not easily expose for a picture:
- The prosternal horn is present.
- The mandible is clearly toothed, not formed into a uniform scraper blade.
- The seems to be only 2 major setae on the ventral edge of the hind femur.
- Chloride epithelia seem to be absent from the dorsal side of any abdominal segments.
Based on these characteristics and the ones more easily visible from the pictures, this seems to be Grammotaulius. The key's description of the case is spot-on: "Case cylindrical, made of longitudinally arranged sedge or similar leaves," as is the description of the markings on the head, "Dorsum of head light brownish yellow with numerous discrete, small, dark spots." The spot pattern on the head is a very good match to figure 19.312 of Merritt R.W., Cummins, K.W., and Berg, M.B. (2019). The species ID is based on Grammotaulius betteni being the only species of this genus known in Washington state.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
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Lastchance
Portage, PA

Posts: 437
Lastchance on May 15, 2010May 15th, 2010, 1:24 am EDT
1.) what size should I tie the dark sulphur emergers that are coming off right now?

2.) does anyone have the FFP's Steve Swyhensky's dubbing mix formula and pattern for it?

3.) anyone care to share a dubbing mix for the later lighter colored sulphur emerger and nymph and size of the emerger?

Martinlf
Martinlf's profile picture
Moderator
Palmyra PA

Posts: 3047
Martinlf on May 15, 2010May 15th, 2010, 6:23 am EDT
Bruce,

Last night on the J I saw 14's and 16's. There are some cahills mixed in. Also some Grey Foxes in 12.

I don't have Steve's mix. Is in the FFP "archives"?

Others have said it before, and I believe it--"when color matters it matters least." Still I go to great lengths with dubbing at times, mostly to satisfy myself. I use the Caucci/Nastasi dubbing for most of my sulphurs. It is (very) approximately 60% white, 20% yellow, 10% red (they use a fluorescent red) and 10% light blue. They call it pale yellow. A light cahill dubbing that is yellowish would be very similar. I also tie some sulphurs with a brighter yellow. I caught one trout yesterday that regurgitated a bunch of sulphurs that were a bright yellow. Just emerged, I'd guess.

The later sulphurs are 16-20, I'd say. Ask JAD if you want to know for sure, though.

Best of luck.
"He spread them a yard and a half. 'And every one that got away is this big.'"

--Fred Chappell
Flatstick96
Flatstick96's profile picture
Posts: 127
Flatstick96 on May 17, 2010May 17th, 2010, 4:17 am EDT
1) It's been so long since I've tied any that I don't remember (I never get up there during the sulphurs any more). I'm thinking though that it's probably the same as what Steve recommends for the nymphs (the recipe for which IS in the archives on the FFP site, as suggested by Louis). He ties the nymphs in #12 - #16.

2) I'll save you the trouble of looking through the FFP archive; the answer is:

"Blend of 50% dyed brown Australian opossum and 50% orange sparkle yarn"

3) Don't know, I've only ever fished the darker one really heavily. I'm sure if you call FFP, Steve will be happy to tell you what he uses.
Martinlf
Martinlf's profile picture
Moderator
Palmyra PA

Posts: 3047
Martinlf on May 17, 2010May 17th, 2010, 6:02 am EDT
Bruce, if you're tying a floating nymph type emerger, certainly the dark brown is the color. I was referring to the emerging mayfly dun itself. For the nymph I believe any dark brown will work; Steve's blend is a good one. On the dun color I just read an article by Al Caucci in which he says the bigger invaria is lighter creamish yellow, while the dorthea is more yellowish, if that helps any. The dorthea nymph is lighter than the invaria. I use a tan dubbing or biot for that nymph.
"He spread them a yard and a half. 'And every one that got away is this big.'"

--Fred Chappell
Lastchance
Portage, PA

Posts: 437
Lastchance on May 17, 2010May 17th, 2010, 11:47 am EDT
Thanks for the help, guys.
Bruce

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