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Lateral view of a Male Baetis (Baetidae) (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Dun from Mystery Creek #43 in New York
Blue-winged Olives
Baetis

Tiny Baetis mayflies are perhaps the most commonly encountered and imitated by anglers on all American trout streams due to their great abundance, widespread distribution, and trout-friendly emergence habits.

Dorsal view of a Setvena wahkeena (Perlodidae) (Wahkeena Springfly) Stonefly Nymph from Mystery Creek #199 in Washington
As far as I can tell, this species has only previously been reported from one site in Oregon along the Columbia gorge. However, the key characteristics are fairly unmistakable in all except for one minor detail:
— 4 small yellow spots on frons visible in photos
— Narrow occipital spinule row curves forward (but doesn’t quite meet on stem of ecdysial suture, as it's supposed to in this species)
— Short spinules on anterior margin of front legs
— Short rposterior row of blunt spinules on abdominal tergae, rather than elongated spinules dorsally
I caught several of these mature nymphs in the fishless, tiny headwaters of a creek high in the Wenatchee Mountains.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
Troutnut is a project started in 2003 by salmonid ecologist Jason "Troutnut" Neuswanger to help anglers and fly tyers unabashedly embrace the entomological side of the sport. Learn more about Troutnut or support the project for an enhanced experience here.

Softhackle has attached this picture. The message is below.
Softhackle
Softhackle's profile picture
Wellsville, NY

Posts: 540
Softhackle on Jun 19, 2008June 19th, 2008, 12:10 pm EDT
Here's a photo taken by my son-in-law, Bill as we fished the Beaverkill during the first week of June '08. The closest fisherman is my son, Mark, the next is yours truly, and the last man in line is my other son-in-law, Andrew. What a great memory this evening was, lifted right out of a daydream or movie.
"I have the highest respect for the skilled wet-fly fisherman, as he has mastered an art of very great difficulty." Edward R. Hewitt

Flymphs, Soft-hackles and Spiders: http://www.troutnut.com/libstudio/FS&S/index.html
Jjlyon01
SUNY Environmental Science and Forestry, Syracuse

Posts: 71
Jjlyon01 on Jun 19, 2008June 19th, 2008, 2:51 pm EDT
That movie... could it be on of the greatest classics ever? A River Runs Through It.
"I now walk into the wild"
CamWolf1313
Andover, MA/ Andover NH

Posts: 18
CamWolf1313 on Jun 20, 2008June 20th, 2008, 4:30 pm EDT
Great picture. How did you do on the trip fishing wise, because it seems like you had a lot of fun.
"Clear your mind of everything but the fish and the fly and you will be in the right mind frame to land it"
Billy Berger.
Softhackle
Softhackle's profile picture
Wellsville, NY

Posts: 540
Softhackle on Jun 21, 2008June 21st, 2008, 4:29 am EDT
Hi Cam,
Well, We arrived about 2:30 PM Thursday, June 5 and settled into our accomodations. We visited the fly shops in Roscoe for a few purchases then headed to the water about 4PM.

Fishing was tough as the water was a little low. Insect activity was sporadic, but we saw fish working. My son took one right about where was standing in the photo. About a 12" brown trout was released back to the water.

We decided to try the Willowemoc, and found it quiet. We took positions in good spots and My son and Son-in-law Bill both took 3 nice trout, all browns. The largest was about 17".

Next morning brought fog, and while I headed off to tie at the Clearwater Junction event, the boys fished the Beaverkill once more without success.

Later, after my tying was done, we returned to the Willow, and again took a number of nice trout in the 12" - 20" range. The next morning found us on the Willow once more. Trout were surfacing well, but were hard to please with imitations. These fish are well-educated. Between the four of us we only managed two trout of moderate size.

Saturday was quite warm,close to 90, and the water temps had climbed 10 degrees from 64 degrees that morning. So, we did not fish long at all that evening. Sunday morning was cool, damp and foggy, and we fished the Willow getting a few nice trout.

The greatest percentage of trout taken that weekend was to olive imitations, mostly wet flies, not dry. By far the most effective pattern was Weilenmann's Partridge and Olive Emerger, 14. Second best was to a fly I tie called a Genesee Jewel, wet #10. Only two fish were taken with a dry Blue Winged Olive #14.

We did some shopping, and socializing at the Clearwater Junction Show. Some of the tiers present were Roy Christie, Andy Brasko, Ralph Graves, Steve Thornton, Ted Patlen,Mark Romero, Dave Brandt and Allen McGee.. We had a great weekend that ended all too quickly.

Mark

"I have the highest respect for the skilled wet-fly fisherman, as he has mastered an art of very great difficulty." Edward R. Hewitt

Flymphs, Soft-hackles and Spiders: http://www.troutnut.com/libstudio/FS&S/index.html
CamWolf1313
Andover, MA/ Andover NH

Posts: 18
CamWolf1313 on Jul 6, 2008July 6th, 2008, 6:29 pm EDT
That sounds like a lot of fun. I haven't had the chance to take an extended trip but i have been fishing a lot and i have to say i am pretty jelious that you were able to get the chance to go.

Tight Lines,
Cam
"Clear your mind of everything but the fish and the fly and you will be in the right mind frame to land it"
Billy Berger.
Softhackle
Softhackle's profile picture
Wellsville, NY

Posts: 540
Softhackle on Jul 7, 2008July 7th, 2008, 2:13 am EDT
Cam,
Now, that it is getting warmer, I'm sure the fishing has dropped off a little in the Beaverkill and Willowemoc. These rivers are only good, now for early morning fishing. It probably will not get any better till fall, unless we get a bout of unseasonal cooler temperatures and enough rain to keep the flows going.

I believe the West branch of the Delaware is still fishable with cooler water temperatures.

Perhaps, you still might get to Roscoe at some point. Don't give up.

Mark
"I have the highest respect for the skilled wet-fly fisherman, as he has mastered an art of very great difficulty." Edward R. Hewitt

Flymphs, Soft-hackles and Spiders: http://www.troutnut.com/libstudio/FS&S/index.html
CamWolf1313
Andover, MA/ Andover NH

Posts: 18
CamWolf1313 on Jul 9, 2008July 9th, 2008, 2:51 pm EDT
Thanks for advice Mark. I luckily have a small mountain stream that stays relatively cool all summer. Their are large amounts of wild brookies and a mix of stocked and natural rainbows and browns. The fish aren't always that big but every once and a while you can land a 14' brookie and my friend just caught a 21' brown. My best fish there to date has been a 30' brown. Those fish are a rarity but there are consistant small brookies. Amazingly it is in the East but it is not pressured as some of the other rivers. It is a hike from the major hiking path but it still is fun.
Good Luck Mark
"Clear your mind of everything but the fish and the fly and you will be in the right mind frame to land it"
Billy Berger.

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