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Lateral view of a Female Hexagenia limbata (Ephemeridae) (Hex) Mayfly Dun from the Namekagon River in Wisconsin
Hex Mayflies
Hexagenia limbata

The famous nocturnal Hex hatch of the Midwest (and a few other lucky locations) stirs to the surface mythically large brown trout that only touch streamers for the rest of the year.

Lateral view of a Clostoeca disjuncta (Limnephilidae) (Northern Caddisfly) Caddisfly Larva from the Yakima River in Washington
This one was surprisingly straightforward to identify. The lack of a sclerite at the base of the lateral hump narrows the field quite a bit, and the other options followed fairly obvious characteristics to Clostoeca, which only has one species, Clostoeca disjuncta.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
Troutnut is a project started in 2003 by salmonid ecologist Jason "Troutnut" Neuswanger to help anglers and fly tyers unabashedly embrace the entomological side of the sport. Learn more about Troutnut or support the project for an enhanced experience here.

This discussion is about the Bois Brule River.

Cedar sweepers line the fertile spring creek headwaters of a famous trout stream.

From the Bois Brule River in Wisconsin
Gnarled cedars twist out over a nice trout stream.

From the Bois Brule River in Wisconsin
This tail end of a large glassy flat holds many nice rising trout most summer evenings, and it's extremely demanding of both stealth and fine casting.

From the Bois Brule River in Wisconsin
The Bois Brule River in Wisconsin
Kclubepro
Posts: 1
Kclubepro on Jul 9, 2018July 9th, 2018, 2:29 pm EDT
My wife and I will be visiting Brule in Mid-July, staying for several days. Any advice on fly fishing spots on the Brule River would be appreciated
Troutnut
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Bellevue, WA

Posts: 2758
Troutnut on Jul 9, 2018July 9th, 2018, 3:04 pm EDT
The upper river, state highway S and US highway 2, is the classic trout water. A canoe trip from S down to Winneboujou landing is a popular option that covers the majority of this reach.

I don't want to give away secret walk-in spots people told me in confidence, but if you have several days you should be able to find some good ones on your own. There aren't all that many public ways to access it, so good maps are your friend. If you go to any of the really obvious spots (bridges, etc) you'll probably have company and find moderately-pressured fish.

To reach the best fishing without floating, you'll want to walk farther from the easy access points, either by wading long distances or by hiking long distances through lesser-known public land routes.

Jason Neuswanger, Ph.D.
Troutnut and salmonid ecologist

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