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Lateral view of a Male Baetis (Baetidae) (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Dun from Mystery Creek #43 in New York
Blue-winged Olives
Baetis

Tiny Baetis mayflies are perhaps the most commonly encountered and imitated by anglers on all American trout streams due to their great abundance, widespread distribution, and trout-friendly emergence habits.

Lateral view of a Female Sweltsa borealis (Chloroperlidae) (Boreal Sallfly) Stonefly Adult from Harris Creek in Washington
I was not fishing, but happened to be at an unrelated social event on a hill above this tiny creek (which I never even saw) when this stonefly flew by me. I assume it came from there. Some key characteristics are tricky to follow, but process of elimination ultimately led me to Sweltsa borealis. It is reassuringly similar to this specimen posted by Bob Newell years ago. It is also so strikingly similar to this nymph from the same river system that I'm comfortable identifying that nymph from this adult. I was especially pleased with the closeup photo of four mites parasitizing this one.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
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Btbo32 has attached this picture to aid in identification. The message is below.
Btbo32
Posts: 13
Btbo32 on Oct 27, 2017October 27th, 2017, 7:48 am EDT
Would anyone happen to know what kind of nymph these could be?
Jersey Boy
Millcreek
Healdsburg, CA

Posts: 344
Millcreek on Oct 27, 2017October 27th, 2017, 11:26 am EDT
My guess and it's only a guess would be Maccaffertium. When were they collected, what size were they and where were they collected?
"If we knew what it was we were doing, it would not be called research, would it?"
-Albert Einstein
Btbo32
Posts: 13
Btbo32 on Oct 27, 2017October 27th, 2017, 2:02 pm EDT
I collected these today on the Big Flatbrook in Sussex County Nj. I would say going by hook size probably 12-14. Not sure what a Maccaffertium is..sorry new at learning all these aquatic insects. Please advise if you could? Thanks for reaching out!
Jersey Boy
Btbo32
Posts: 13
Btbo32 on Oct 27, 2017October 27th, 2017, 2:42 pm EDT
I think you were correct ( Cream Cahill nymph)
Thank you!
Jersey Boy
Btbo32
Posts: 13
Btbo32 on Oct 27, 2017October 27th, 2017, 2:58 pm EDT
Anyone have an idea of a good imitation fly pattern this nymph?
Jersey Boy
Millcreek
Healdsburg, CA

Posts: 344
Millcreek on Oct 27, 2017October 27th, 2017, 2:59 pm EDT
Maccaffertium is the name of a heptageniidae (flat-headed) mayfly nymph and adult. The reason I guessed Maccaffertium is because the front leg is fairly wide at the femur and looks to be banded with brown and a whitish color and because it has the general body configuration of a flat-headed nymph. I'm going on guess work as much as anything.
"If we knew what it was we were doing, it would not be called research, would it?"
-Albert Einstein
Wbranch
Wbranch's profile picture
York & Starlight PA

Posts: 2635
Wbranch on Oct 29, 2017October 29th, 2017, 3:36 am EDT
Maccaffertium


I thought this was the nymph of the March Brown. BTW Big Flatbrook was my "home" trout stream for about 25 years until I bought a cabin on the Delaware River.
Catskill fly fisher for fifty-five years.
Btbo32
Posts: 13
Btbo32 on Nov 4, 2017November 4th, 2017, 12:01 pm EDT
March Brown? Wow great! Thanks.
Jersey Boy

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