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Lateral view of a Male Baetis (Baetidae) (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Dun from Mystery Creek #43 in New York
Blue-winged Olives
Baetis

Tiny Baetis mayflies are perhaps the most commonly encountered and imitated by anglers on all American trout streams due to their great abundance, widespread distribution, and trout-friendly emergence habits.

Lateral view of a Clostoeca disjuncta (Limnephilidae) (Northern Caddisfly) Caddisfly Larva from the Yakima River in Washington
This one was surprisingly straightforward to identify. The lack of a sclerite at the base of the lateral hump narrows the field quite a bit, and the other options followed fairly obvious characteristics to Clostoeca, which only has one species, Clostoeca disjuncta.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
Troutnut is a project started in 2003 by salmonid ecologist Jason "Troutnut" Neuswanger to help anglers and fly tyers unabashedly embrace the entomological side of the sport. Learn more about Troutnut or support the project for an enhanced experience here.

Martinlf
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Palmyra PA

Posts: 3047
Martinlf on Apr 28, 2007April 28th, 2007, 2:58 pm EDT
Fishing a small freestone that Gonzo knows pretty well, this evening I found a number of Hendrickson spinners in the air, dark brown, size 12 or 14, bright yellow egg mass. But there were also some other spinners, brown on the top, cream on the bottom. I caught one that seemed to have a small whitish egg mass. It seems early, but might this have been a March Brown? It was about a size 14 or 12, and not as stocky looking as the subvarias, with a definite kink in its abdomen, making it look like it was drying up some. I know March Browns are typically much bigger on larger streams, but I believe they run to the small side on this stream. Any suggestions? I guess I'll have to get a camera!

Almost forgot to give a fishing report: Caught a handful of little wild browns up to about 9 inches, and a nice fat wild rainbow also about 9 inches. Beautiful evening.
"He spread them a yard and a half. 'And every one that got away is this big.'"

--Fred Chappell
Troutnut
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Bellevue, WA

Posts: 2758
Troutnut on Apr 28, 2007April 28th, 2007, 5:23 pm EDT
Glad to hear somebody's catching fish! I've had nothing but skunkings this year, and right now the rivers aren't fishable. We haven't had decent fishing conditions here yet.

As for your mayfly, have you flipped through the Heptageniidae specimens on this site and see if anything catches your eye? I might have something similar.
Jason Neuswanger, Ph.D.
Troutnut and salmonid ecologist
Martinlf
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Moderator
Palmyra PA

Posts: 3047
Martinlf on Apr 28, 2007April 28th, 2007, 11:36 pm EDT
Nah, I was being lazy (or thinking about tying some flies) last night when I posted up the question. Actually I just couldn't think of another bug it might be. But your idea was a good one. It may have been an Epeorus pleuralis, Quill Gordon, spinner which I did not think hatched in this stream. But this creek is always surprising me. Thanks for the tip, Jason. Come down to PA, trout are rising; and things have to improve up your way with warmer weather approaching. Good luck in future outings.
"He spread them a yard and a half. 'And every one that got away is this big.'"

--Fred Chappell
GONZO
Site Editor
"Bear Swamp," PA

Posts: 1681
GONZO on Apr 29, 2007April 29th, 2007, 3:47 am EDT
Louis, I'm pretty sure they were QG spinners. That creek does have them. (Or, at least, it did when I was young.)

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