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Lateral view of a Male Baetis (Baetidae) (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Dun from Mystery Creek #43 in New York
Blue-winged Olives
Baetis

Tiny Baetis mayflies are perhaps the most commonly encountered and imitated by anglers on all American trout streams due to their great abundance, widespread distribution, and trout-friendly emergence habits.

Dorsal view of a Amphizoa (Amphizoidae) Beetle Larva from Sears Creek in Washington
This is the first of it's family I've seen, collected from a tiny, fishless stream in the Cascades. The three species of this genus all live in the Northwest and are predators that primarily eat stonefly nymphs Merritt R.W., Cummins, K.W., and Berg, M.B. (2019).
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
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RustySpinnr has attached this picture to aid in identification. The message is below.
RustySpinnr
RustySpinnr's profile picture
Musconetcong watershed, northwest NJ

Posts: 3
RustySpinnr on Mar 26, 2012March 26th, 2012, 10:10 am EDT
I recently took this underwater shot in the Big Flat Brook River in northwest NJ and can't properly ID the mayfly in the picture. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks in advance.
Entoman
Entoman's profile picture
Northern CA & ID

Posts: 2604
Entoman on Mar 26, 2012March 26th, 2012, 11:13 am EDT
Hi Rusty,

Welcome to the forum!

Looks like Maccaffertium vicarium (March Brown) to me, based on the dark tergal banding and head markings. A much better look at the gills (and a few other features) is necessary to know for sure, though.
"It's not that I find fishing so important, it's just that I find all other endeavors of Man equally unimportant... And not nearly as much fun!" Robert Traver, Anatomy of a Fisherman
Oldredbarn
Oldredbarn's profile picture
Novi, MI

Posts: 2600
Oldredbarn on Mar 26, 2012March 26th, 2012, 12:35 pm EDT
Kurt,

You seem to be the man these days...Mr. Bug-ID guy...You are working overtime there fella! Get much sleep? :)

How about that big fat, waiting to be popped off the rock there and in to a trout, caddis larva? :)

Spence

"Even when my best efforts fail it's a satisfying challenge, and that, after all, is the essence of fly fishing." -Chauncy Lively

"Envy not the man who lives beside the river, but the man the river flows through." Joseph T Heywood
Entoman
Entoman's profile picture
Northern CA & ID

Posts: 2604
Entoman on Mar 26, 2012March 26th, 2012, 1:07 pm EDT
Yes, I quit my day job. Jason's pay is much better...:)

The caddis is in the genus Rhyacophila (Green Rockworm, Green Sedge). Based on what can be seen of the the head capsule and notum markings, I suspect the species fuscala.
"It's not that I find fishing so important, it's just that I find all other endeavors of Man equally unimportant... And not nearly as much fun!" Robert Traver, Anatomy of a Fisherman
RustySpinnr
RustySpinnr's profile picture
Musconetcong watershed, northwest NJ

Posts: 3
RustySpinnr on Mar 26, 2012March 26th, 2012, 1:59 pm EDT
Hi Rusty,

Welcome to the forum!

Looks like Maccaffertium vicarium (March Brown) to me, based on the dark tergal banding and head markings. A much better look at the gills (and a few other features) is necessary to know for sure, though.


Thanks, it looks different than most Maccaffertium I come across.
RustySpinnr
RustySpinnr's profile picture
Musconetcong watershed, northwest NJ

Posts: 3
RustySpinnr on Mar 26, 2012March 26th, 2012, 2:02 pm EDT
Yes, I quit my day job. Jason's pay is much better...:)

The caddis is in the genus Rhyacophila (Green Rockworm, Green Sedge). Based on what can be seen of the the head capsule and notum markings, I suspect the species fuscala.


I'm pretty sure that Rhyaccophila is attacking the cased caddis which is why I loved this shot. I had only noticed the mayfly nymph from walking through the stream and stopped to put my camera underwater to get a better idea of what I was looking at. Only after downloading this picture did I see the other action. In fact, I first thought I might be looking at a stonefly and not a mayfly nymph as I didn't have on polarized glasses at the time...
Entoman
Entoman's profile picture
Northern CA & ID

Posts: 2604
Entoman on Mar 27, 2012March 27th, 2012, 1:19 am EDT
Yes, very unusual, especially the reddish legs. As for what that rockworm is dining on, not sure what the heck that is.:)
"It's not that I find fishing so important, it's just that I find all other endeavors of Man equally unimportant... And not nearly as much fun!" Robert Traver, Anatomy of a Fisherman
Jesse
Jesse's profile picture
Posts: 378
Jesse on Mar 30, 2012March 30th, 2012, 7:07 pm EDT
That is a great picture my man, nice work!
Most of us fish our whole lives..not knowing its not the fish that we are after.
http://www.filingoflyfishing.com

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