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Lateral view of a Female Hexagenia limbata (Ephemeridae) (Hex) Mayfly Dun from the Namekagon River in Wisconsin
Hex Mayflies
Hexagenia limbata

The famous nocturnal Hex hatch of the Midwest (and a few other lucky locations) stirs to the surface mythically large brown trout that only touch streamers for the rest of the year.

Ventral view of a Hydropsyche (Hydropsychidae) (Spotted Sedge) Caddisfly Larva from the Yakima River in Washington
With a bit of help from the microscope, this specimen keys clearly and unsurprisingly to Hydropsyche.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
Troutnut is a project started in 2003 by salmonid ecologist Jason "Troutnut" Neuswanger to help anglers and fly tyers unabashedly embrace the entomological side of the sport. Learn more about Troutnut or support the project for an enhanced experience here.

Byhaugh
Hawaii

Posts: 56
Byhaugh on Aug 13, 2014August 13th, 2014, 1:28 pm EDT
Stoneflies?
Mayflies?
Or Caddisflies
PaulRoberts
PaulRoberts's profile picture
Colorado

Posts: 1776
PaulRoberts on Aug 13, 2014August 13th, 2014, 3:55 pm EDT
Depends on species and type of pollution. There are species within each that are adapted to somewhat reduced oxygen levels (a common result of organic and physical pollution). Of the three, I think there are few if any stoneflies that are adapted to warmer, lower O2 waters.

What is your interest? School project?
Catskilljon
Upstate NY

Posts: 160
Catskilljon on Aug 13, 2014August 13th, 2014, 6:50 pm EDT
If I had to make an assumption based on what I have seen, its stonefly, mayfly and caddis in that order going from cleanest to polluted. There are a few streams in NJ that don't have stoneflies, have a few mayflies but are loaded with caddis, and these are streams running through and around semi-populated housing and business districts.

When I see stonefly shucks on the rocks of a new stream I have never fished...it makes me smile. They are the live canary in the cold mine. CJ
Crepuscular
Crepuscular's profile picture
Boiling Springs, PA

Posts: 920
Crepuscular on Aug 14, 2014August 14th, 2014, 7:27 am EDT
Depends on species and type of pollution. There are species within each that are adapted to somewhat reduced oxygen levels (a common result of organic and physical pollution). Of the three, I think there are few if any stoneflies that are adapted to warmer, lower O2 waters.

What is your interest? School project?


Byhaugh, It's tough to make generalizations about that topic. It's not that simple. Google Hilsenhoff tolerance values and that will get you started. Like Paul pointed out it depends upon what type of pollution you are taking about. For example, some stonefly genera can take a much lower pH than other stoneflies. Depending upon the specific type of pollution, there may be certain genera of a particular insect order present but others will not be there. So the point I suppose I'm trying to make is that to generalize on the order level of classification may not really be that meaningful.
Lastchance
Portage, PA

Posts: 437
Lastchance on Aug 14, 2014August 14th, 2014, 1:12 pm EDT
sulfurs

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