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Lateral view of a Male Baetis (Baetidae) (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Dun from Mystery Creek #43 in New York
Blue-winged Olives
Baetis

Tiny Baetis mayflies are perhaps the most commonly encountered and imitated by anglers on all American trout streams due to their great abundance, widespread distribution, and trout-friendly emergence habits.

Dorsal view of a Ephemerella mucronata (Ephemerellidae) Mayfly Nymph from the Yakima River in Washington
This is an interesting one. Following the keys in Merritt R.W., Cummins, K.W., and Berg, M.B. (2019) and Jacobus et al. (2014), it keys clearly to Ephemerella. Jacobus et al provide a key to species, but some of the characteristics are tricky to interpret without illustrations. If I didn't make any mistakes, this one keys to Ephemerella mucronata, which has not previously been reported any closer to here than Montana and Alberta. The main character seems to fit well: "Abdominal terga with prominent, paired, subparallel, spiculate ridges." Several illustrations or descriptions of this holarctic species from the US and Europe seem to match, including the body length, tarsal claws and denticles, labial palp, and gill shapes. These sources include including Richard Allen's original description of this species in North America under the now-defunct name E. moffatae in Allen RK (1977) and the figures in this description of the species in Italy.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
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Doublezz105
Posts: 4
Doublezz105 on Jul 8, 2007July 8th, 2007, 1:34 am EDT
I have no photo, but I had a mayfly light on me on the Beaver River in Pennsylvania. It was an adult with brilliant neon green eyes, with the same color on the body. I've looked through photos on the website, but didn't find anything with those beautiful eyes. I'm not a fisherman, just a bug lover, and am curious if anyone has an idea what it was. I have ID books on larvae stages, but I guess I need to buy a book on adult stage
Taxon
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Plano, TX

Posts: 1311
Taxon on Jul 8, 2007July 8th, 2007, 10:18 am EDT
Doublezz105-

Well, you certainly didn't provide sufficient descriptive information on which one could base even a reasonably reliable guess, but that rarely stops me from attempting to make one.

So, I would say you might have been visited by a Maccaffertium mediopunctatum mediopunctatum male dun, previously classified as Stenonema mediopunctatum, and sometimes referred to as an Olive Cahill Quill.
Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
Doublezz105
Posts: 4
Doublezz105 on Jul 9, 2007July 9th, 2007, 9:05 am EDT
Thanks. I'll try to be more observant. Oh for a camera at the right time! Do you have any recommendations for a book primarily on identification and life history?
Taxon
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Plano, TX

Posts: 1311
Taxon on Jul 9, 2007July 9th, 2007, 10:07 am EDT
Doublezz105-

There are many good books, and which one is the best choice for you depends on many factors. On the pragmatic end of the scale are some small hatch guides which feature the more likely aquatic insect emergences you are likely to encounter streamside. Other books exclusively feature one insect order, like mayflies, for example. Other books cover all aquatic insects, but usually not to the species level.

This is a subject that is dear to my heart, and I wrote an article about it titled Entomology Bookshelf in the December 2006 issue of Hatches Magazine. My suggestion is that you read the article before deciding which book or books to purchase.
Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com

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