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Lateral view of a Male Baetis (Baetidae) (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Dun from Mystery Creek #43 in New York
Blue-winged Olives
Baetis

Tiny Baetis mayflies are perhaps the most commonly encountered and imitated by anglers on all American trout streams due to their great abundance, widespread distribution, and trout-friendly emergence habits.

Lateral view of a Onocosmoecus (Limnephilidae) (Great Late-Summer Sedge) Caddisfly Larva from the Yakima River in Washington
This specimen keys pretty easily to Onocosmoecus, and it closely resembles a specimen from Alaska which caddis expert Dave Ruiter recognized as this genus. As with that specimen, the only species in the genus documented in this area is Onocosmoecus unicolor, but Dave suggested for that specimen that there might be multiple not-yet-distinguished species under the unicolor umbrella and it would be best to stick with the genus-level ID. I'm doing the same for this one.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
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Stenonema ithaca (Light Cahill) Mayfly Nymph Pictures

This specimen seems to be of the same species as a dun I photographed which emerged from another nymph in the same sample.

Ruler view of a Stenonema ithaca (Heptageniidae) (Light Cahill) Mayfly Nymph from Paradise Creek in Pennsylvania The smallest ruler marks are 1 mm.
Dorsal view of a Stenonema ithaca (Heptageniidae) (Light Cahill) Mayfly Nymph from Paradise Creek in Pennsylvania
Ventral view of a Stenonema ithaca (Heptageniidae) (Light Cahill) Mayfly Nymph from Paradise Creek in Pennsylvania
Stenonema ithaca (Heptageniidae) (Light Cahill) Mayfly Nymph from Paradise Creek in Pennsylvania
Stenonema ithaca (Heptageniidae) (Light Cahill) Mayfly Nymph from Paradise Creek in Pennsylvania
Stenonema ithaca (Heptageniidae) (Light Cahill) Mayfly Nymph from Paradise Creek in Pennsylvania
Stenonema ithaca (Heptageniidae) (Light Cahill) Mayfly Nymph from Paradise Creek in Pennsylvania
Lateral view of a Stenonema ithaca (Heptageniidae) (Light Cahill) Mayfly Nymph from Paradise Creek in Pennsylvania
Stenonema ithaca (Heptageniidae) (Light Cahill) Mayfly Nymph from Paradise Creek in Pennsylvania

This mayfly was collected from Paradise Creek in Pennsylvania on May 29th, 2007 and added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on June 4th, 2007.

Discussions of this Nymph

Maccaffertium mediopunctatum
1 replies
Posted by Taxon on Jun 5, 2007
Last reply on Jun 5, 2007 by Quillgordon
Maccaffertium is a Latinized version of the name of the world-renowned mayfly systematist, W. Patrick McCafferty. And, mediopunctatum is constructed from roots of medi- meaning middle, and punct- meaning point, so I assume this species has some distinctive feature midpoint in its anatomy. Assuming my logic is valid, perhaps someone else can tell you what the feature is.

The distribution of this species is confined to the states and provinces lying east of the N. American continental divide.
Name basis.....
Posted by Quillgordon on Jun 5, 2007
Last reply on Jun 5, 2007 by Quillgordon
This is the same specimen that I collected from a stream nearby.
Can anyone tell me the history( name basis) for this insect ?
Is it common across the country?

Thanks....

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Stenonema ithaca (Light Cahill) Mayfly Nymph Pictures

Collection details
Location: Paradise Creek, Pennsylvania
Date: May 29th, 2007
Added to site: June 4th, 2007
Author: Troutnut
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