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Artistic view of a Male Pteronarcys californica (Pteronarcyidae) (Giant Salmonfly) Stonefly Adult from the Gallatin River in Montana
Salmonflies
Pteronarcys californica

The giant Salmonflies of the Western mountains are legendary for their proclivity to elicit consistent dry-fly action and ferocious strikes.

Lateral view of a Clostoeca disjuncta (Limnephilidae) (Northern Caddisfly) Caddisfly Larva from the Yakima River in Washington
This one was surprisingly straightforward to identify. The lack of a sclerite at the base of the lateral hump narrows the field quite a bit, and the other options followed fairly obvious characteristics to Clostoeca, which only has one species, Clostoeca disjuncta.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
Troutnut is a project started in 2003 by salmonid ecologist Jason "Troutnut" Neuswanger to help anglers and fly tyers unabashedly embrace the entomological side of the sport. Learn more about Troutnut or support the project for an enhanced experience here.

Millcreek has attached these 3 pictures to aid in identification. The message is below.
Millcreek
Healdsburg, CA

Posts: 344
Millcreek on Jan 11, 2015January 11th, 2015, 7:07 am EST
These are Ecdyonurus nymphs with Symbiocladius parasitizing them. They were collected from Mill Creek, a tributary of the Russian River. Symbiocladius are a member of Diptera, the true flies. They attach themselves behind the wingpads and grow to maturity there without harming the Ecdyonurus nymph. They parasitize Paraleptophebia and Rhithrogena as well though not in this area.
"If we knew what it was we were doing, it would not be called research, would it?"
-Albert Einstein
Millcreek
Healdsburg, CA

Posts: 344
Millcreek on Jan 11, 2015January 11th, 2015, 7:26 am EST
An added note:
Here is a pdf on Symbiocladius. http://pte.au.poznan.pl/ppe/PPE1-2007/285-291_Gilka_i_in.pdf
"If we knew what it was we were doing, it would not be called research, would it?"
-Albert Einstein
Entoman
Entoman's profile picture
Northern CA & ID

Posts: 2604
Entoman on Jan 11, 2015January 11th, 2015, 7:56 am EST
Fascinating, Mark. Are they just attaching themselves for pupation or are they feeding off them?
"It's not that I find fishing so important, it's just that I find all other endeavors of Man equally unimportant... And not nearly as much fun!" Robert Traver, Anatomy of a Fisherman
Crepuscular
Crepuscular's profile picture
Boiling Springs, PA

Posts: 920
Crepuscular on Jan 11, 2015January 11th, 2015, 8:13 am EST
COOL! thanks for posting Mark!
Millcreek
Healdsburg, CA

Posts: 344
Millcreek on Jan 11, 2015January 11th, 2015, 10:06 am EST
Kurt-

They feed off them. They attach themselves and feed off haemolymph (bug blood) and associated tissues.


Eric-

You're welcome.
"If we knew what it was we were doing, it would not be called research, would it?"
-Albert Einstein
Entoman
Entoman's profile picture
Northern CA & ID

Posts: 2604
Entoman on Jan 11, 2015January 11th, 2015, 12:36 pm EST
Thanks, only noticed your link after posting my question. Oh, well...:)

"It's not that I find fishing so important, it's just that I find all other endeavors of Man equally unimportant... And not nearly as much fun!" Robert Traver, Anatomy of a Fisherman

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