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Lateral view of a Male Baetis (Baetidae) (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Dun from Mystery Creek #43 in New York
Blue-winged Olives
Baetis

Tiny Baetis mayflies are perhaps the most commonly encountered and imitated by anglers on all American trout streams due to their great abundance, widespread distribution, and trout-friendly emergence habits.

Dorsal view of a Limnephilidae (Giant Sedges) Caddisfly Larva from the Yakima River in Washington
This specimen resembled several others of around the same size and perhaps the same species, which were pretty common in my February sample from the upper Yakima. Unfortunately, I misplaced the specimen before I could get it under a microscope for a definitive ID.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
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Willmilne has attached this picture to aid in identification. The message is below.
Willmilne
Manitoba Canada

Posts: 19
Willmilne on Jan 25, 2010January 25th, 2010, 8:02 am EST
Hi whilst doing some high magnification images of a mayfly specimen I noticed what appear to be eggs attached to the head. I'm curious if anyone could offer a suggestion as to what they are or even if they are eggs. I understand there are stonefly parasites is this also true of mayflies?

cheers

Will
Konchu
Konchu's profile picture
Site Editor
Indiana

Posts: 498
Konchu on Jan 25, 2010January 25th, 2010, 8:42 am EST
I'm not sure what those are base on the picture, but I often see mystery things attached to specimens. Sometimes, these are a fungus, and rarely they are aquatic mites. A frequent thing I see is little pale pouches of "goo" that appear as an artifact of the fixation and preservation process.

These could be eggs of some kind, but what kind I do not know. Might even be eggs from another mayfly. Many of these adhere to whatever happens to be on the stream bottom, even if it is another living thing.

By the way, is that a Baetisca mayfly?

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