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Lateral view of a Female Hexagenia limbata (Ephemeridae) (Hex) Mayfly Dun from the Namekagon River in Wisconsin
Hex Mayflies
Hexagenia limbata

The famous nocturnal Hex hatch of the Midwest (and a few other lucky locations) stirs to the surface mythically large brown trout that only touch streamers for the rest of the year.

Lateral view of a Male Baetidae (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Dun from Mystery Creek #308 in Washington
This dun emerged from a mature nymph on my desk. Unfortunately its wings didn't perfectly dry out.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
Troutnut is a project started in 2003 by salmonid ecologist Jason "Troutnut" Neuswanger to help anglers and fly tyers unabashedly embrace the entomological side of the sport. Learn more about Troutnut or support the project for an enhanced experience here.

Millcreek has attached these 9 pictures. The message is below.
In alcohol. 30 mm. April 13, 2014. Photo taken same day as collected so color is pretty close to the live naiad.
In alcohol. 30 mm. April 13, 2014. Head of specimen above.
In alcohol. 30 mm. April 13, 2014. Mentum of H. americana.
Live specimen. 32 mm. April 9, 2014.
Live specimen. Gills. April 9, 2014.
Live specimen. Closeup of head. April 9, 2014.
Live specimen. 30 mm. August 2, 2014.
Live specimen. 30 mm. November 12, 2014.
Live specimen. 20 mm. November 12, 2014.
Millcreek
Healdsburg, CA

Posts: 344
Millcreek on Nov 14, 2014November 14th, 2014, 10:39 am EST
I identified this damselfly naiad to genus using Merritt, Cummins and Berg (2008). As far as I can tell only one species, H. americana is known to occur in California out of the four, possibly five species that are recorded for the United States. The naiads are most commonly found in areas of calm water on floating vegetation.
A common naiad to find in the Russian River. I've included several pictures since they vary quite a bit in coloration.
"If we knew what it was we were doing, it would not be called research, would it?"
-Albert Einstein
Martinlf
Martinlf's profile picture
Moderator
Palmyra PA

Posts: 3047
Martinlf on Nov 15, 2014November 15th, 2014, 12:53 pm EST
Gorgeous photos. Your contributions here are making me realize how many different food forms that trout may have available to them, as well as alerting me to many unfamiliar critters. It helps keep my fishing imagination alive over the winter. Thanks.
"He spread them a yard and a half. 'And every one that got away is this big.'"

--Fred Chappell
Millcreek
Healdsburg, CA

Posts: 344
Millcreek on Nov 17, 2014November 17th, 2014, 9:00 am EST
Louis - Yeah, no wonder the trout can be so picky, they've got a smorgasbord at their fin-tips. Always amazing how many different types of protein packages are in the river for them.
Mark
"If we knew what it was we were doing, it would not be called research, would it?"
-Albert Einstein

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