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Lateral view of a Male Baetis (Baetidae) (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Dun from Mystery Creek #43 in New York
Blue-winged Olives
Baetis

Tiny Baetis mayflies are perhaps the most commonly encountered and imitated by anglers on all American trout streams due to their great abundance, widespread distribution, and trout-friendly emergence habits.

Dorsal view of a Epeorus albertae (Heptageniidae) (Pink Lady) Mayfly Nymph from the East Fork Issaquah Creek in Washington
This specimen keys to the Epeorus albertae group of species. Of the five species in that group, the two known in Washington state are Epeorus albertae and Epeorus dulciana. Of the two, albertae has been collected in vastly more locations in Washington than dulciana, suggesting it is far more common. On that basis alone I'm tentatively putting this nymph in albertae, with the large caveat that there's no real information to rule out dulciana.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
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Millcreek has attached these 10 pictures. The message is below.
Larval exuvia
Millcreek
Healdsburg, CA

Posts: 344
Millcreek on Oct 16, 2014October 16th, 2014, 1:52 pm EDT
The season for Isonychia is pretty much past on the Russian River for the year but I found this straggler today. When I caught the nymph it was kind of sluggish and twitching. Thought it was injured during collection but then noticed it had an unusual, almost plastic look to it and about half an hour later the adult started emerging. Isonychia nymphs usually crawl out on a rock or piece of wood when they emerge but apparently they can do it in calm water as well. Doesn't take long for the whole process. From the exoskeleton splitting along the back to full emergence of the subimago took about 30 seconds.

Female. Length of larva and subimago 22 mm (excluding cerci).
"If we knew what it was we were doing, it would not be called research, would it?"
-Albert Einstein
Martinlf
Martinlf's profile picture
Moderator
Palmyra PA

Posts: 3047
Martinlf on Oct 17, 2014October 17th, 2014, 6:13 pm EDT
Love these emergence photos! Thanks.
"He spread them a yard and a half. 'And every one that got away is this big.'"

--Fred Chappell
Nutman71
Nutman71's profile picture
Pa/NY

Posts: 1
Nutman71 on Dec 29, 2016December 29th, 2016, 12:45 am EST
This is a great photo set , color of shuck and wing, I have been doing my own study of these as I love to fish them when I can. There seems to be an idea that they only emerge in slow water , or on the banks of the rive. I have seen this bug swim at super speeds and emerge mid river, with fish destroying them! I'm working on emerger patterns for them.
Fly tier interested in bug life
Martinlf
Martinlf's profile picture
Moderator
Palmyra PA

Posts: 3047
Martinlf on Dec 29, 2016December 29th, 2016, 2:14 pm EST
Nutman, I've watched them emerge midstream also. So neat! A klinkhamer style emerger works at times. I sometimes tie it with a twisted marabou abdomen, with some hanging off the end as tails/ shuck.
"He spread them a yard and a half. 'And every one that got away is this big.'"

--Fred Chappell
PaulRoberts
PaulRoberts's profile picture
Colorado

Posts: 1776
PaulRoberts on Dec 29, 2016December 29th, 2016, 10:13 pm EST
Yes, wonderful images.

I've seen mid-stream emergences too.

Loved those Iso's (bicolor), when I was back East. Haven't run into anything fishable here yet. I had a nymph tie I really liked, both dead-drifted and fished actively. One particularly satisfying memory was finding Iso activity on a small unsung NY stream on the day Charlie Meck arrived to fish it with me (he putting together a book on unsung streams). I took a deep-shouldered brown in the 16" range on a 6-1/2ft 3wt from that little creek that day, swinging my Iso tie.
Millcreek
Healdsburg, CA

Posts: 344
Millcreek on Dec 30, 2016December 30th, 2016, 3:13 am EST
I've never seen Isoynchia emerge midstream, but my references are western species. They seem to emerge on shore or near it, from rocks or wood where there is a dry area. I'll keep my eyes out for midstream emergence.
"If we knew what it was we were doing, it would not be called research, would it?"
-Albert Einstein
PaulRoberts
PaulRoberts's profile picture
Colorado

Posts: 1776
PaulRoberts on Dec 30, 2016December 30th, 2016, 6:34 am EST
I. biocolor also emerges from shoreline substrate, like many stoneflies do. But they, like some stoneflies, can also emerge mid-stream. Isn't there anything rock solid in the living world?
Jmd123
Jmd123's profile picture
Oscoda, MI

Posts: 2474
Jmd123 on Jan 2, 2017January 2nd, 2017, 10:51 am EST
"Isn't there anything rock solid in the living world?"

Not if Mother Nature has anything to do with it! Remember, insects don't read entomology text books...or any other books for that matter.

I can remember many times when I was delineating a wetland and certain plant species were growing in the "wrong" place. Well, plants don't read wetland manuals...

Jonathon
No matter how big the one you just caught is, there's always a bigger one out there somewhere...

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