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Lateral view of a Female Hexagenia limbata (Ephemeridae) (Hex) Mayfly Dun from the Namekagon River in Wisconsin
Hex Mayflies
Hexagenia limbata

The famous nocturnal Hex hatch of the Midwest (and a few other lucky locations) stirs to the surface mythically large brown trout that only touch streamers for the rest of the year.

Dorsal view of a Kogotus (Perlodidae) Stonefly Nymph from Mystery Creek #199 in Washington
This one pretty clearly keys to Kogotus, but it also looks fairly different from specimens I caught in the same creek about a month later in the year. With only one species of the genus known in Washington, I'm not sure about the answer to this ID.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
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DayTripper
DayTripper's profile picture
Northern MI

Posts: 70
DayTripper on Jun 30, 2009June 30th, 2009, 12:58 am EDT
I was hoping someone could help clear up a few Isonychia questions I have-

Last I checked, Isonychia sadleri was lumped in with Isonychia bicolor, correct?

Not that there were any substantial differences between the two, at least as far as physical appearance from an angler's perspective; but I was under the impression that it was sadleri that emerged in the stream, and bicolor that crawled out and emerged on the river bank. With the two species now being lumped together, is it accurate to say that bicolor emerges both in the stream and on the bank? Thanks!
GONZO
Site Editor
"Bear Swamp," PA

Posts: 1681
GONZO on Jun 30, 2009June 30th, 2009, 3:19 am EDT
Yes and yes, Alex: In addition to sadleri, several other former species (albomanicata, christina, circe, fattigi, harperi, matilda, and pacoleta) are now considered to be synonymous with bicolor. The character of the stream and prevailing water conditions will probably determine the predominant manner of emergence, but individuals are capable of emerging in either way. (Just in case you are interested, a discussion of multi-brooding/voltinism in Isonychia can be found here: http://www.troutnut.com/topic/178 )
DayTripper
DayTripper's profile picture
Northern MI

Posts: 70
DayTripper on Jun 30, 2009June 30th, 2009, 4:05 am EDT
Thanks, Gonzo!

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