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Lateral view of a Male Baetis (Baetidae) (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Dun from Mystery Creek #43 in New York
Blue-winged Olives
Baetis

Tiny Baetis mayflies are perhaps the most commonly encountered and imitated by anglers on all American trout streams due to their great abundance, widespread distribution, and trout-friendly emergence habits.

Dorsal view of a Amphizoa (Amphizoidae) Beetle Larva from Sears Creek in Washington
This is the first of it's family I've seen, collected from a tiny, fishless stream in the Cascades. The three species of this genus all live in the Northwest and are predators that primarily eat stonefly nymphs Merritt R.W., Cummins, K.W., and Berg, M.B. (2019).
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
Troutnut is a project started in 2003 by salmonid ecologist Jason "Troutnut" Neuswanger to help anglers and fly tyers unabashedly embrace the entomological side of the sport. Learn more about Troutnut or support the project for an enhanced experience here.

GldstrmSam
GldstrmSam's profile picture
Fairbanks, Alaska

Posts: 212
GldstrmSam on Apr 6, 2014April 6th, 2014, 12:23 am EDT
Hi everyone,

I am heading south to Wisconsin for a while coming up in May. I will be in the northern area (Sawyer County). I was wondering what all your opinions are on some good patterns for trout in the rivers and bass in the lakes. I already talked to Jason and he was very helpful, but the proverb goes, "In an abundance of counselors plans succeed," so I wanted your takes on it also. I am not much of a dry guy. I like nymphs, but if you want to throw a few good dry patterns in anyway then I would still snatch up the patterns fly, line, and backing (Ok..slightly altered), but anyway thanks for your time.

I am busy so I might not be able to check back on here very often. Be prepared if you ask a question, you may or may not get a quick reply.

Samuel
There is no greater fan of fly fishing than the worm. ~Patrick F. McManus
Wiflyfisher
Wiflyfisher's profile picture
Wisconsin

Posts: 622
Wiflyfisher on Apr 6, 2014April 6th, 2014, 2:15 pm EDT
I like nymphs

Hare's ear soft hackle, pheasant tail soft hackle and PT nymphs, sizes #12 to #18. Plus, woolly buggers in black and dark brown.

It is still winter up there with over 3 feet of snow and the lakes have about 24"-30" of ice still.

Bass season doesn't open until mid-June.
GldstrmSam
GldstrmSam's profile picture
Fairbanks, Alaska

Posts: 212
GldstrmSam on Apr 6, 2014April 6th, 2014, 9:56 pm EDT
Alright, Thanks John! I will be around long enough to hit it still. I am going down to work so it won't make a difference if the ice goes out late.
My friend down there gives me a hard time because I sent our weather down, but did not take it back yet. :) Please enjoy it for me...actually I don't miss it so you can keep it until I arrive. As for me I will enjoy the slush and mud of spring.
There is no greater fan of fly fishing than the worm. ~Patrick F. McManus

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