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Lateral view of a Female Hexagenia limbata (Ephemeridae) (Hex) Mayfly Dun from the Namekagon River in Wisconsin
Hex Mayflies
Hexagenia limbata

The famous nocturnal Hex hatch of the Midwest (and a few other lucky locations) stirs to the surface mythically large brown trout that only touch streamers for the rest of the year.

Dorsal view of a Glossosoma (Glossosomatidae) (Little Brown Short-horned Sedge) Caddisfly Larva from the Yakima River in Washington
I caught this tiny larva without a case, but it seems to key pretty clearly to to Glossosomatidae. From there, the lack of sclerites on the mesonotum points to either Glossosoma or Anagapetus. Although it's difficult to see in a 2D image from the microscope, it's pretty clear in the live 3D view that the pronotum is only excised about 1/3 of its length to accommodate the forecoxa, not 2/3, which points to Glossosoma at Couplet 5 of the Key to Genera of Glossosomatidae Larvae.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
Troutnut is a project started in 2003 by salmonid ecologist Jason "Troutnut" Neuswanger to help anglers and fly tyers unabashedly embrace the entomological side of the sport. Learn more about Troutnut or support the project for an enhanced experience here.

Crepuscular
Crepuscular's profile picture
Boiling Springs, PA

Posts: 920
Crepuscular on Mar 10, 2014March 10th, 2014, 5:56 am EDT
Ok since we haven't seen a bug for a while. Any thoughts on this one? Collected 5/19/2013. South Central PA.
Taxon
Taxon's profile picture
Site Editor
Plano, TX

Posts: 1311
Taxon on Mar 10, 2014March 10th, 2014, 9:44 am EDT
Hi Eric-

I believe this female imago to be of genus Stenacron.
Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
Crepuscular
Crepuscular's profile picture
Boiling Springs, PA

Posts: 920
Crepuscular on Mar 12, 2014March 12th, 2014, 3:12 pm EDT
Stenacron interpunctatum interpunctatum do have more pics of her ????

Mack.


Why?
Wiflyfisher
Wiflyfisher's profile picture
Wisconsin

Posts: 622
Wiflyfisher on Mar 12, 2014March 12th, 2014, 4:12 pm EDT
Your mayfly looks a similar to the the Stenacron mayfly I photographed 2-3 years ago.



Jmd123
Jmd123's profile picture
Oscoda, MI

Posts: 2474
Jmd123 on Mar 12, 2014March 12th, 2014, 8:31 pm EDT
WOW, beautiful photos, both of you guys!

Jonathon
No matter how big the one you just caught is, there's always a bigger one out there somewhere...
Wiflyfisher
Wiflyfisher's profile picture
Wisconsin

Posts: 622
Wiflyfisher on Mar 13, 2014March 13th, 2014, 4:31 am EDT
One of the things I always thought of when seeing Stenacron was the length of their wing seems to me to be much longer compared to their body length than many other mayflies.

The mayfly in this pic is out of focus but you can see from this side view the long wing...



Then look at this iso which seems to have a wider wing but more in proportion with their body...



versus fat chubby wings...


Wiflyfisher
Wiflyfisher's profile picture
Wisconsin

Posts: 622
Wiflyfisher on Mar 13, 2014March 13th, 2014, 4:06 pm EDT
Wing to body mass... I try not to think that deep.

Mack, here is Stenacron on the on the rocks...


Oldredbarn
Oldredbarn's profile picture
Novi, MI

Posts: 2600
Oldredbarn on Mar 27, 2014March 27th, 2014, 7:41 am EDT
For us colorblind folk, how would you describe that body color there? You can really see what Marinaro/Fox were talking about when they spoke of translucence and the difficulty a tiers has in trying to copy up to natures standards. Wow! Beautiful bug.

Spence
"Even when my best efforts fail it's a satisfying challenge, and that, after all, is the essence of fly fishing." -Chauncy Lively

"Envy not the man who lives beside the river, but the man the river flows through." Joseph T Heywood
JOHNW
JOHNW's profile picture
Chambersburg, PA

Posts: 452
JOHNW on Mar 27, 2014March 27th, 2014, 12:30 pm EDT
In order from top to bottom
#1-3, 6 Orange Cahill
#4 Slate Drake (although I am missing the white gloves)
#5Lemon Cahill
But that is just my local vernacular showing and by no means should be taken as Binomial Gospel
;)
JW
"old habits are hard to kill once you have gray in your beard" -Old Red Barn
Oldredbarn
Oldredbarn's profile picture
Novi, MI

Posts: 2600
Oldredbarn on Mar 28, 2014March 28th, 2014, 4:54 pm EDT
It's easy to see why us fly fisherfolk have always been so enamoreed with mayflies...We are probably the only people on the planet that think a "bug" is beautiful.

:)

Spence

No one's answered my dubbing/color question...How do I get there with those colors...I like to mix my own beaver dub...so 1/3 whatever, 1/3 whatever...etc...How do you attempt to reproduce such incredible colors???
"Even when my best efforts fail it's a satisfying challenge, and that, after all, is the essence of fly fishing." -Chauncy Lively

"Envy not the man who lives beside the river, but the man the river flows through." Joseph T Heywood
Entoman
Entoman's profile picture
Northern CA & ID

Posts: 2604
Entoman on Mar 29, 2014March 29th, 2014, 8:56 am EDT
I agree Spence, the sulfur colors are very tough to describe, let alone match. Schwiebert and other authors have often used the word "illusive" when discussing them - and with good reason. To make matters worse, they often differ dramatically between hatches and even individuals. Then we have to consider the good/bad news of the final arbiters of our efforts (the trout). They are often fickle about it as well. Usually, the closest match is the way to go, but not always. Sometimes a simple tan or gray version of the same pattern will outperform "the perfect match." Wished I knew why... :)

The "spectrumized" method of dubbing was popular for awhile but never achieved universal acceptance. I think the reason is because while the mixing of primary colors may appear to blend and look good in the hand, in macro (the way trout see it) the red, yellow & blue are clearly isolated and unnatural looking.

The best way I've found to match these illusive colors is to start out with a base that approximates the most dominant shade. It's usually a compromise between the lighter belly and darker back. A common misconception is that trout only see the belly. Not true. The back colors definitely have influence. Sometimes if the difference is dramatic it's even good to two-tone your flies with shellbacks or marking pens.

For this fly I'd start with amber, add a little orange and even less pink or perhaps a little cream or pale yellow if I need to lighten it a little. Spin some in your fingers to dense it up and approximate a fly body. Adjust as needed. I use this technique for all my hatch matching and will apply it to my same favorite patterns as the standard grays and tans that are always carried. Natural beaver belly is awesome stuff. Trout often key into a single color for some reason (perhaps the reason for spectrumized dubbing's occasional superiority) and I've often added say a little bright orange or yellow to the nat. beaver with great success.

Some guys worry about how dubbing looks wet or dry, but this is an unnecessary canard, IMO. While colors appear darker when wet, this is because they are being observed out of the water. When on or in the water they will look pretty much the same as when dry. A good example to demonstrate this is with a red floss body. Wet and out of the water it looks very dark - put it back in the water and it's bright red again.
"It's not that I find fishing so important, it's just that I find all other endeavors of Man equally unimportant... And not nearly as much fun!" Robert Traver, Anatomy of a Fisherman
Oldredbarn
Oldredbarn's profile picture
Novi, MI

Posts: 2600
Oldredbarn on Mar 29, 2014March 29th, 2014, 12:43 pm EDT
Sometimes if the difference is dramatic it's even good to two-tone your flies with shellbacks or marking pens.


Our Brown Drakes have that sharp line, if you will, between the lower bottom half of the fly and the top. Some tiers will wrap the body with a yellowish/cream yarn and then lay darker deer across the back of the abdomen, criss-crossing it with yellow or brown thread.

When I tie the little sulpher, the dorothea I have two different bits of mixed beaver. Near the tail and around the thorax the mixture has some orange in it and the other is a creamy yellow.

Looks good to me. :)

Spence

You know I went through a spell years back where I carried Gary Borgers little color booklet and kept notes as I went...Ok. There! I said it...Nerd!:)
"Even when my best efforts fail it's a satisfying challenge, and that, after all, is the essence of fly fishing." -Chauncy Lively

"Envy not the man who lives beside the river, but the man the river flows through." Joseph T Heywood
Smeador
Smeador's profile picture
Prospect, VA

Posts: 6
Smeador on Mar 29, 2014March 29th, 2014, 2:46 pm EDT
Oldredbarn - there have been days when collecting a nymph I haven't found in the stream I'm fishing is WAY cooler than any of the fish I caught that day. LOL! Glad to hear there are others like me...
JOHNW
JOHNW's profile picture
Chambersburg, PA

Posts: 452
JOHNW on Mar 29, 2014March 29th, 2014, 4:11 pm EDT
Spence,
My approach for say pink alberts (epeorus sp I think) is to use a very light dubbing over a thread that is in the realm of the overall color. In that case a hot pink under very sparse cream. It kind of answers the translucence issue .
JW
"old habits are hard to kill once you have gray in your beard" -Old Red Barn
Entoman
Entoman's profile picture
Northern CA & ID

Posts: 2604
Entoman on Mar 29, 2014March 29th, 2014, 4:31 pm EDT
Spence -

You know I went through a spell years back where I carried Gary Borgers little color booklet and kept notes as I went...Ok. There! I said it...Nerd!:)

Actually, I confess the same. :)

Lost mine several years ago and they are now out of print. Small digital cameras & smart phones have rendered it obsolete, though. What a boon these cameras are. The macro views show the heather subtleties that look solid in the hand. Really helps with dubbing selection.

Btw - I almost always rib the abdomens of my dubbed dry flies. Makes them more durable and captures the segmention very well.
"It's not that I find fishing so important, it's just that I find all other endeavors of Man equally unimportant... And not nearly as much fun!" Robert Traver, Anatomy of a Fisherman

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