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Artistic view of a Male Pteronarcys californica (Pteronarcyidae) (Giant Salmonfly) Stonefly Adult from the Gallatin River in Montana
Salmonflies
Pteronarcys californica

The giant Salmonflies of the Western mountains are legendary for their proclivity to elicit consistent dry-fly action and ferocious strikes.

Lateral view of a Onocosmoecus (Limnephilidae) (Great Late-Summer Sedge) Caddisfly Larva from the Yakima River in Washington
This specimen keys pretty easily to Onocosmoecus, and it closely resembles a specimen from Alaska which caddis expert Dave Ruiter recognized as this genus. As with that specimen, the only species in the genus documented in this area is Onocosmoecus unicolor, but Dave suggested for that specimen that there might be multiple not-yet-distinguished species under the unicolor umbrella and it would be best to stick with the genus-level ID. I'm doing the same for this one.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
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Shanti
Sweden

Posts: 95
Shanti on Jul 12, 2012July 12th, 2012, 4:50 am EDT
Me and some friends have already started talking about next years trips, just for fun.
And since I love small streams I've suggested the Driftless area.
I don't know anything about it other than what I've seen on youtube and it sure looks nice.

How crowded is this place? And when would be a good time to go there?
Somewhere, right now, a fish is rising.
And you´re at the computer..
RleeP
NW PA - Pennsylvania's Glacial Pothole Wonderland

Posts: 398
RleeP on Jul 13, 2012July 13th, 2012, 2:11 pm EDT
>>How crowded is this place?>>

It varies.. By Eastern US standards, not very crowded at all. But from the perspective of somebody who has been fishing the area for many years, it would probably seem pretty crowded. This is my 12th year fishing the area and I'd say the pressure has about doubled in that time. The fact that there are a couple hundred streams to choose from helps spread things out a bit. The "name" creeks (about a dozen) are more busy, some to the point that I don't bother with them any more. But I'm on the far radical end of other angler phobic, so don't pay any attention to me. Objectively, the overall pressure could probably be best described as moderate. You can almost always find a place of your own with a modest bit of effort.


>And when would be a good time to go there?>

This is important...:) Don't come in High Summer, say from 6/15 to 8/30. You'll fry your brain. It can be hotter than all hell (low to mid 90's are not uncommon and with no shade, even 85 feels like 105) and the majority of the streams run through meadows or pastures with little shade, the weeds are high, the gnats are miserable and the fishing is often limited to early and late by water temps that are pretty elastic as a result of strong spring input but little shade. In summer, a lot of the streams will be 52F at day break, 72F at 4PM and then 62F at dusk. The fish react to this roller coaster by going into a fugue state of sorts for most of the day.

Come in mid-May to early June or after the 1st of September until the end of the month when the season closes. If you decide to give it a go, let me know here or by PM and I'll give you some stream ideas to avoid the worst of the pressure and still have real good fishing.

Lee
PaulRoberts
PaulRoberts's profile picture
Colorado

Posts: 1776
PaulRoberts on Jul 13, 2012July 13th, 2012, 4:18 pm EDT
Great description, Lee.
Shanti
Sweden

Posts: 95
Shanti on Jul 13, 2012July 13th, 2012, 10:41 pm EDT
Thank you, RleeP.
This was very helpful!
And it confirmed the impression I have of the area.

We are playing around with different options, if we decide for Wisconsin I'll let you know.
Thanks again!
Somewhere, right now, a fish is rising.
And you´re at the computer..
RleeP
NW PA - Pennsylvania's Glacial Pothole Wonderland

Posts: 398
RleeP on Jul 14, 2012July 14th, 2012, 8:01 am EDT
Well, you're certainly more than welcome and as I said, if you do decide to come this way, I can help. Just give a yell.

Just as an afterthought, if you're a lover of small streams, you may also want to consider a trip to one of the trout regions along the Appalachian spine in the Eastern US. There is good small stream fishing for wild trout all along the mountains from Maine to Georgia and just about any destination in the region would put you in a position to have far more streams to choose from than time to fish them. The best of it (and this is just opinion) in terms of fishing quality and scenery is probably in Vermont, New Hampshire, western North Carolina and perhaps Northcentral Pennsylvania. The fish would average somewhat smaller than Driftless fish (but surprisingly, not that much smaller), but the scenery is a lot nicer and there is a lot more shade...:)
Shanti
Sweden

Posts: 95
Shanti on Jul 14, 2012July 14th, 2012, 11:36 am EDT
Well, you're certainly more than welcome and as I said, if you do decide to come this way, I can help. Just give a yell.

Just as an afterthought, if you're a lover of small streams, you may also want to consider a trip to one of the trout regions along the Appalachian spine in the Eastern US. There is good small stream fishing for wild trout all along the mountains from Maine to Georgia and just about any destination in the region would put you in a position to have far more streams to choose from than time to fish them. The best of it (and this is just opinion) in terms of fishing quality and scenery is probably in Vermont, New Hampshire, western North Carolina and perhaps Northcentral Pennsylvania. The fish would average somewhat smaller than Driftless fish (but surprisingly, not that much smaller), but the scenery is a lot nicer and there is a lot more shade...:)


Again, very helpful!

I will look into those suggestions, thanks!
Somewhere, right now, a fish is rising.
And you´re at the computer..
Entoman
Entoman's profile picture
Northern CA & ID

Posts: 2604
Entoman on Jul 14, 2012July 14th, 2012, 11:41 am EDT
Just as an afterthought, if you're a lover of small streams, you may also want to consider a trip to one of the trout regions along the Appalachian spine in the Eastern US. There is good small stream fishing for wild trout all along the mountains from Maine to Georgia and just about any destination in the region would put you in a position to have far more streams to choose from than time to fish them. The best of it (and this is just opinion) in terms of fishing quality and scenery is probably in Vermont, New Hampshire, western North Carolina and perhaps Northcentral Pennsylvania. The fish would average somewhat smaller than Driftless fish (but surprisingly, not that much smaller), but the scenery is a lot nicer and there is a lot more shade...:)


In terms of "the best of it" I would only add the state of Maine. It takes a little homework to find them, but there are still lots of small streams there (and a gazillion ponds) full of brookies where you can go all day without seeing another angler. I like the Western Mountain region, but any of the more remote locations still have the largest native brook trout in the lower 48.
"It's not that I find fishing so important, it's just that I find all other endeavors of Man equally unimportant... And not nearly as much fun!" Robert Traver, Anatomy of a Fisherman
Shanti
Sweden

Posts: 95
Shanti on Jul 14, 2012July 14th, 2012, 1:07 pm EDT
Just as an afterthought, if you're a lover of small streams, you may also want to consider a trip to one of the trout regions along the Appalachian spine in the Eastern US. There is good small stream fishing for wild trout all along the mountains from Maine to Georgia and just about any destination in the region would put you in a position to have far more streams to choose from than time to fish them. The best of it (and this is just opinion) in terms of fishing quality and scenery is probably in Vermont, New Hampshire, western North Carolina and perhaps Northcentral Pennsylvania. The fish would average somewhat smaller than Driftless fish (but surprisingly, not that much smaller), but the scenery is a lot nicer and there is a lot more shade...:)


In terms of "the best of it" I would only add the state of Maine. It takes a little homework to find them, but there are still lots of small streams there (and a gazillion ponds) full of brookies where you can go all day without seeing another angler. I like the Western Mountain region, but any of the more remote locations still have the largest native brook trout in the lower 48.


Thanks for the input, Entoman.

I remember reading something about Maine in a Drake issue.
Sounds great, and yes, "remote" is a word that appeals to me.


Somewhere, right now, a fish is rising.
And you´re at the computer..
PaulRoberts
PaulRoberts's profile picture
Colorado

Posts: 1776
PaulRoberts on Jul 15, 2012July 15th, 2012, 11:39 am EDT
Stop it. I'm beginning to develop some wanderlust -which is not in my general character.
Shanti
Sweden

Posts: 95
Shanti on Jul 15, 2012July 15th, 2012, 11:51 am EDT
Stop it. I'm beginning to develop some wanderlust -which is not in my general character.


You can have some of mine, I have too much.
Somewhere, right now, a fish is rising.
And you´re at the computer..

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