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Artistic view of a Male Pteronarcys californica (Pteronarcyidae) (Giant Salmonfly) Stonefly Adult from the Gallatin River in Montana
Salmonflies
Pteronarcys californica

The giant Salmonflies of the Western mountains are legendary for their proclivity to elicit consistent dry-fly action and ferocious strikes.

Case view of a Pycnopsyche guttifera (Limnephilidae) (Great Autumn Brown Sedge) Caddisfly Larva from the Yakima River in Washington
It's only barely visible in one of my pictures, but I confirmed under the microscope that this one has a prosternal horn and the antennae are mid-way between the eyes and front of the head capsule.

I'm calling this one Pycnopsyche, but it's a bit perplexing. It seems to key definitively to at least Couplet 8 of the Key to Genera of Limnephilidae Larvae. That narrows it down to three genera, and the case seems wrong for the other two. The case looks right for Pycnopsyche, and it fits one of the key characteristics: "Abdominal sternum II without chloride epithelium and abdominal segment IX with only single seta on each side of dorsal sclerite." However, the characteristic "metanotal sa1 sclerites not fused, although often contiguous" does not seem to fit well. Those sclerites sure look fused to me, although I can make out a thin groove in the touching halves in the anterior half under the microscope. Perhaps this is a regional variation.

The only species of Pycnopsyche documented in Washington state is Pycnopsyche guttifera, and the colors and markings around the head of this specimen seem to match very well a specimen of that species from Massachusetts on Bugguide. So I am placing it in that species for now.

Whatever species this is, I photographed another specimen of seemingly the same species from the same spot a couple months later.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
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Troutnabout
Posts: 20
Troutnabout on Nov 27, 2006November 27th, 2006, 4:52 pm EST
can anyone identify this caddisfly and the green leaves used in the home construction?
Troutnabout
Posts: 20
Troutnabout on Nov 27, 2006November 27th, 2006, 4:59 pm EST
Sorry about my last post. I couldn't figure out how to add a picture attachment. The original photograph is at flyfishing entemology.com. the pictue is titled caddis home.
Taxon
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Plano, TX

Posts: 1311
Taxon on Nov 27, 2006November 27th, 2006, 5:14 pm EST
Sorry about my last post. I couldn't figure out how to add a picture attachment. The original photograph is at flyfishing entemology.com. the pictue is titled caddis home.


Troutabout-

If you are referring to FlyfishingEntomology.com, I'm not aware of any file titled caddis home on my site. However, I did Google/Images "caddis home" and found the following photo from Michelle Mahood's gallery: http://www.pbase.com/michellemahood/image/24877105

Is that the photo?
Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
Troutnabout
Posts: 20
Troutnabout on Nov 27, 2006November 27th, 2006, 5:33 pm EST
roger that's it. sorry about the incomplete info.
Taxon
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Plano, TX

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Taxon on Nov 27, 2006November 27th, 2006, 5:51 pm EST
Troutabout-

No problem. I would guess the photo is of a cased Platycentropus larva. As to which species of leaf was used in construction of the case, that question will need be answered by someone else.
Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
Troutnabout
Posts: 20
Troutnabout on Nov 27, 2006November 27th, 2006, 6:00 pm EST
Roger:you are the man! Thanks for your timely responses. I entered a fly swap challege and was given green artificial lei flowers,tan jute and some black yarn to tie with. I just tied two of them and wanted to know what they imitated. Is this a common species? Where in the US are they found besides CA ?
Troutnut
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Troutnut on Nov 27, 2006November 27th, 2006, 6:06 pm EST
FYI I just moved this topic to the Platycentropus comments based on Roger's ID guess. :)
Jason Neuswanger, Ph.D.
Troutnut and salmonid ecologist
Taxon
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Plano, TX

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Taxon on Nov 27, 2006November 27th, 2006, 6:30 pm EST
Roger:you are the man!


Troutabout-

Well, that stands to be seen. There are others on this site who know much more about caddisflies than do I. As to where they are found, to the best of my knowledge, only in the East and Midwest, where "they are able to thrive in a in a wide variety of habitats, including stillwaters and warmwaters" per Gary LaFontaine.
Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
Litobrancha
Knoxville TN

Posts: 51
Litobrancha on Dec 5, 2006December 5th, 2006, 4:28 am EST
Schmid lists Platycentropus radiatus from Nova Scotia to Manitoba, my records also include AL GA NC SC TN VA northward. don't have records on P. amicus or P. indistinctus but Schmid lists amicus from Quebec to Alberta and indistinctus from Newfoundland to Ontario. all three are as others have said are distributed in the eastern half of the continent so I'll chime and say I bet that ain't Platycentropus from CA. but the prosternal horn character is the one to look for.

Entoman
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Northern CA & ID

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Entoman on Oct 16, 2012October 16th, 2012, 12:01 pm EDT
Ah! Luckily the link to the photo is still good. This looks like a turret-cased species of Lepidostoma to me.
"It's not that I find fishing so important, it's just that I find all other endeavors of Man equally unimportant... And not nearly as much fun!" Robert Traver, Anatomy of a Fisherman
Creno
Grants Pass, OR

Posts: 302
Creno on Oct 17, 2012October 17th, 2012, 7:33 am EDT
I suspect this is an early instar of Limnephilus. I will go out on a limb and say less than 2cm long, perhaps about 1cm. The "large" round "leaves" appear to me to be one of the duckweeds and the threads appear to be filamentous algae. The dark anterior band of the prothorax, which is very distinct in the photo, is characteristic of a couple of the pond Limnephilus species. One of those is the common, widespread Limnephilus externus. I have seen early instar Limnephilus externus with cases just like this in Colorado ponds/reservoirs. Often, because the duckweeds are designed to float, the small case is just floating around in the surface film with the larvae flailing its legs around trying to grab onto something. I wonder if the advantage of such case material choice is dispersal or perhaps they just eat house and home. In any case L. externus does it alot and I suspect others in that group do as well.

There is another picture on Michelle's page with the larvae extended further from the case. That is a very immature larvae, likely 2nd instar, and sclerite coloration does not appear to have fully developed it. Perhaps recently molted?
Entoman
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Northern CA & ID

Posts: 2604
Entoman on Oct 18, 2012October 18th, 2012, 9:48 am EDT
Dave -

I will go out on a limb...

Well, hopefully it's not as flimsy as the one I fell off of.:) I didn't think of an early instar limnephilid, but certainly bow to your expertise. Interesting comments on the drift behavior. I've noticed the same thing, and not just with caddis. Reflects the precarious nature of living a neutral buoyancy life in the weeds, I guess. Wind action - currents caused by turnover - release of their perches to escape predation (or knocked off them by competitors)? I'm thinking these can all be causes as well?
"It's not that I find fishing so important, it's just that I find all other endeavors of Man equally unimportant... And not nearly as much fun!" Robert Traver, Anatomy of a Fisherman

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