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Lateral view of a Male Baetis (Baetidae) (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Dun from Mystery Creek #43 in New York
Blue-winged Olives
Baetis

Tiny Baetis mayflies are perhaps the most commonly encountered and imitated by anglers on all American trout streams due to their great abundance, widespread distribution, and trout-friendly emergence habits.

Dorsal view of a Kogotus (Perlodidae) Stonefly Nymph from Mystery Creek #199 in Washington
This one pretty clearly keys to Kogotus, but it also looks fairly different from specimens I caught in the same creek about a month later in the year. With only one species of the genus known in Washington, I'm not sure about the answer to this ID.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
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Shakeyfly
Massachusetts

Posts: 11
Shakeyfly on Oct 17, 2012October 17th, 2012, 3:18 pm EDT
This is a very amateur question... but do different species or families of caddisflies make their cases out of different materials? or do they all just use whats available to them?

Meaning when I do a search for brachycentrus, I noticed almost all the images are of the 4 sided wooden cases. Are the caddisflies that make their cases out of stones and pebbles a different subgenus/family/species?

Thanks for the input and information!
The fishing was good; it was the catching that was bad - A.K. Best

Catching fish is as incidental to fishing as making babies is to #$%&ing. ~William Humphrey

Here's to swimmin' with bow legged women. - Jaws
Taxon
Taxon's profile picture
Site Editor
Plano, TX

Posts: 1311
Taxon on Oct 17, 2012October 17th, 2012, 6:56 pm EDT
Shakeyfly-

The best categorization of caddisfly larval cases (which I have seen) appears as the row headings of a table in W. Patrick McCafferty's wonderful book, Aquatic Entomology:



The full table has a column for each of the different caddisfly families, but the row headings should provide you a feel for the variety of larval caddisfly case types. I believe that a given species of caddisfly tends to build the save type of cases, but expect there are probably numerous exceptions. With regard to Brachycentrus, as I recall, not all of the species build square cases, as some species build tubular cases.
Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
Shakeyfly
Massachusetts

Posts: 11
Shakeyfly on Nov 19, 2012November 19th, 2012, 9:33 am EST
Thanks for the awesome reply! sorry for the delay..I was out steelheadin! :)
The fishing was good; it was the catching that was bad - A.K. Best

Catching fish is as incidental to fishing as making babies is to #$%&ing. ~William Humphrey

Here's to swimmin' with bow legged women. - Jaws
Risenfly
Risenfly's profile picture
Pennsylvania

Posts: 9
Risenfly on Dec 18, 2012December 18th, 2012, 10:25 am EST
If you're trying to imitate these bugs then try using lead tape. You can form it a bit more than the lead wire to help get the box, or cylinder shape you want and then advance with your other materials.
www.risenfly.com


Fly reels, lines, boxes and accessories. Rods coming in 2014!

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