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Artistic view of a Male Pteronarcys californica (Pteronarcyidae) (Giant Salmonfly) Stonefly Adult from the Gallatin River in Montana
Salmonflies
Pteronarcys californica

The giant Salmonflies of the Western mountains are legendary for their proclivity to elicit consistent dry-fly action and ferocious strikes.

Dorsal view of a Kogotus (Perlodidae) Stonefly Nymph from Mystery Creek #199 in Washington
This one pretty clearly keys to Kogotus, but it also looks fairly different from specimens I caught in the same creek about a month later in the year. With only one species of the genus known in Washington, I'm not sure about the answer to this ID.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
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JOHNW
JOHNW's profile picture
Chambersburg, PA

Posts: 452
JOHNW on Apr 16, 2009April 16th, 2009, 2:41 pm EDT
OK for those wet fly guys out there.
I have been instructed that this is a deadly pattern however I can't find a recipie for it.
The closest I can figure is the partridge and red squirrel soft hackle. What say you all?
JW
"old habits are hard to kill once you have gray in your beard" -Old Red Barn
Softhackle
Softhackle's profile picture
Wellsville, NY

Posts: 540
Softhackle on Apr 17, 2009April 17th, 2009, 1:49 am EDT
I'll see what I can find out.

Mark
"I have the highest respect for the skilled wet-fly fisherman, as he has mastered an art of very great difficulty." Edward R. Hewitt

Flymphs, Soft-hackles and Spiders: http://www.troutnut.com/libstudio/FS&S/index.html
Wetfly1
Johnstown, Pa

Posts: 11
Wetfly1 on Apr 17, 2009April 17th, 2009, 1:57 am EDT
Hi John,

Try tying this pattern for the Hendricksons a good friend of mine has been hammering them on Yellow Breeches for the last few nights in the open water.

Hook: Mustad 3906B #12 or #14

Tail: Dark Dun Hen

Body: Male Hendrickson dubbing

Hackle: Dark Dun Hen

Wing: Dark Mallard Flank

When you dub the body on make sure you make real nice and thin just like the naturals. Let us know how you made out. My buddy told me he thinks there close to being over in the next few days. I would also fish that pattern you mensioned. Fish both those flies at the same time. I think you'll have some good hook ups.
Softhackle
Softhackle's profile picture
Wellsville, NY

Posts: 540
Softhackle on Apr 17, 2009April 17th, 2009, 3:29 pm EDT
I checked with a few friends, and I got one response as follows:

"I could only find one reference to the Hendrickson in Neme's Soft-Hackled fly imitations, but it was Ted Ward's Nymph and Emerger pattern from the Beaverkill.

* Hook: Mustad 94833
* Thread: Uni Dun 8/0
* Hackle: Grey Partridge
* Tail: 3 to 4 lemon wood duck barbs
* Body: Mixture of 2/3rds Sealex #110 and 1/3rd Sealex #117"

Now, I'm not sure this is the pattern you are looking for. Perhaps Syl has not yet publicized the recipe.

I will say that I've had some success fishing a Snipe & Pheasant during the Hendrickson hatch. Here's the recipe I use:

Snipe and Pheasant

Hook: Standard wet fly 12-18

Thread: Orange or brown

Hackle: Snipe or blue dun starling

Ribbing: Fine copper wire

Body: Three reddish brown fibers from a cock pheasant tail. For smaller flies, reduce the number of fibers

Snipe and Pheasant

Hope this helps some.


Mark
"I have the highest respect for the skilled wet-fly fisherman, as he has mastered an art of very great difficulty." Edward R. Hewitt

Flymphs, Soft-hackles and Spiders: http://www.troutnut.com/libstudio/FS&S/index.html

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