Header image
Enter a name
Lateral view of a Female Hexagenia limbata (Ephemeridae) (Hex) Mayfly Dun from the Namekagon River in Wisconsin
Hex Mayflies
Hexagenia limbata

The famous nocturnal Hex hatch of the Midwest (and a few other lucky locations) stirs to the surface mythically large brown trout that only touch streamers for the rest of the year.

Lateral view of a Female Sweltsa borealis (Chloroperlidae) (Boreal Sallfly) Stonefly Adult from Harris Creek in Washington
I was not fishing, but happened to be at an unrelated social event on a hill above this tiny creek (which I never even saw) when this stonefly flew by me. I assume it came from there. Some key characteristics are tricky to follow, but process of elimination ultimately led me to Sweltsa borealis. It is reassuringly similar to this specimen posted by Bob Newell years ago. It is also so strikingly similar to this nymph from the same river system that I'm comfortable identifying that nymph from this adult. I was especially pleased with the closeup photo of four mites parasitizing this one.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
Troutnut is a project started in 2003 by salmonid ecologist Jason "Troutnut" Neuswanger to help anglers and fly tyers unabashedly embrace the entomological side of the sport. Learn more about Troutnut or support the project for an enhanced experience here.

CaseyP
CaseyP's profile picture
Arlington, VA/ Mercersburg, PA

Posts: 653
CaseyP on Oct 22, 2012October 22nd, 2012, 3:37 pm EDT
off to Yorkshire once again. this time the trout are "out of season". guide says they've "other things on their minds than eating." grayling are the quarry this trip. i've caught little ones in Montana who would leap out of the water and attack the fly from above--looked like the cover of an old fishing magazine.

anyone here ever seriously fished for grayling? do they eat underwater trout stuff? and if so, what's on the menu in November in northern England? (perhaps they'd like a grannom for variety!)

now that there are Troutnuts all over the world, maybe there's one in Wharfdale...if so, you'll appreciate knowing that the avatar picture was taken at Bolton Abbey.
"You can observe a lot by watching." Yogi Berra
DUBBN
DUBBN's profile picture
Colorado

Posts: 47
DUBBN on Oct 22, 2012October 22nd, 2012, 5:16 pm EDT
A buddy of mine and I fish for grayling here in Colorado. His favorite pattern is a size 14 bead headed Hares Ear. Mine is a Hares Ear Soft Hackle. Both of us fish the pattern near or on the bottom of the river (Creek).
It's OK to disagree with me. I can not force you to be right.
CaseyP
CaseyP's profile picture
Arlington, VA/ Mercersburg, PA

Posts: 653
CaseyP on Oct 23, 2012October 23rd, 2012, 5:02 am EDT
oh, thanks heaps, Dubbin! i can tie both of those...and there is nothing like your own stuff to instill confidence. ;-)
"You can observe a lot by watching." Yogi Berra
GldstrmSam
GldstrmSam's profile picture
Fairbanks, Alaska

Posts: 212
GldstrmSam on Oct 24, 2012October 24th, 2012, 3:08 pm EDT
The magic fly for me is a bead-head brassie. I have caught about 90% of my grayling on them...well maybe it's because that is pretty much the only fly I use for them.:)

Sam
There is no greater fan of fly fishing than the worm. ~Patrick F. McManus
CaseyP
CaseyP's profile picture
Arlington, VA/ Mercersburg, PA

Posts: 653
CaseyP on Oct 24, 2012October 24th, 2012, 6:16 pm EDT
The magic fly for me is a bead-head brassie

are those as easy to tie as they look? shoot, that's a no-brainer!
"You can observe a lot by watching." Yogi Berra
GldstrmSam
GldstrmSam's profile picture
Fairbanks, Alaska

Posts: 212
GldstrmSam on Oct 25, 2012October 25th, 2012, 9:11 am EDT
They are so simple, cheap to tie, and EFFECTIVE that I always try to keep a plentiful stash in my fly box. I've caught grayling, dolly varden and rainbow trout on it.
There is one problem about the fly...or maybe it could just be my tying style.:) The peacock hurl tends to unwind. So instead of tying two or three hurls in at once I'll try doing one at a time.

There is no greater fan of fly fishing than the worm. ~Patrick F. McManus
CaseyP
CaseyP's profile picture
Arlington, VA/ Mercersburg, PA

Posts: 653
CaseyP on Nov 19, 2012November 19th, 2012, 3:13 pm EST
an update for those who were kind enough to help me out with advice:

had two really great days grayling fishing on the Rivers Ure and Nidd. caught most on a small klinkhamer-style dry, a CDC "sedge" (trans: caddis), and a bead-headed nymph that bore a striking resemblance to a brassie, all supplied by the guide. the water was too high in the River Wharfe near my friends' house, so my one outing there was not productive--glad i had booked two days with a pro! had perfect, if chilly, weather. everyone over there was just delighted with the sunny moments; in November they are very rare.

off to the photo-posting place to see if i can add a couple of grip-n-grins...
"You can observe a lot by watching." Yogi Berra
Feathers5
Posts: 287
Feathers5 on Nov 20, 2012November 20th, 2012, 4:31 am EST
They are so simple, cheap to tie, and EFFECTIVE that I always try to keep a plentiful stash in my fly box. I've caught grayling, dolly varden and rainbow trout on it.
There is one problem about the fly...or maybe it could just be my tying style.:) The peacock hurl tends to unwind. So instead of tying two or three hurls in at once I'll try doing one at a time.




Try making a dubbing rope (loop) with the peacock herl. I tie my prince nymphs that way and they hold up much longer.
GldstrmSam
GldstrmSam's profile picture
Fairbanks, Alaska

Posts: 212
GldstrmSam on Nov 24, 2012November 24th, 2012, 11:17 am EST
...and a bead-headed nymph that bore a striking resemblance to a brassie...


Thata' fly :)


There is no greater fan of fly fishing than the worm. ~Patrick F. McManus

Quick Reply

Related Discussions

Topic
Replies
Last Reply
2
May 26, 2009
by Shawnny3
1
Sep 27, 2009
by Martinlf
Troutnut.com is copyright © 2004-2024 (email Jason). privacy policy