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Lateral view of a Female Hexagenia limbata (Ephemeridae) (Hex) Mayfly Dun from the Namekagon River in Wisconsin
Hex Mayflies
Hexagenia limbata

The famous nocturnal Hex hatch of the Midwest (and a few other lucky locations) stirs to the surface mythically large brown trout that only touch streamers for the rest of the year.

Dorsal view of a Pycnopsyche guttifera (Limnephilidae) (Great Autumn Brown Sedge) Caddisfly Larva from the Yakima River in Washington
This specimen appears to be of the same species as this one collected in the same spot two months earlier. The identification of both is tentative. This one suffered some physical damage before being photographed, too, so the colors aren't totally natural. I was mostly photographing it to test out some new camera setting idea, which worked really well for a couple of closeups.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
Troutnut is a project started in 2003 by salmonid ecologist Jason "Troutnut" Neuswanger to help anglers and fly tyers unabashedly embrace the entomological side of the sport. Learn more about Troutnut or support the project for an enhanced experience here.

Updates from August 23, 2004

Updates from August 23, 2004

Photos by Troutnut from the Beaverkill River and the West Branch of the Delaware River in New York

This 15" brown trout took a small emergent sparkle pupa on a large Catskill river.
Here's an underwater post-release picture of a 15" brown trout I caught in a clear Catskill river.
This is one of the most famous trout streams in the country.

From the West Branch of the Delaware River in New York
The Beaverkill River in New York
Here's the most famous pool in the world. I was shocked that the fishing was so good--I had expected such a legendary place to be overfished. While it certainly sees a lot of pressure, it's still possible to have the whole 300-yard pool to yourself once in a while, and in the fall it doesn't get anywhere close to the combat fishing it sees during the major hatch seasons. It supports a terrific population of the most picky free-rising trout I've ever seen.

From the Beaverkill River in New York
The Beaverkill River in New York
The West Branch of the Delaware River in New York
A beautiful deep current tongue runs along a manmade wall on a famous Catskill river.

From the Beaverkill River in New York
The Beaverkill River in New York
The Beaverkill River in New York
The Beaverkill River in New York

On-stream insect photos by Troutnut from the Beaverkill River in New York

Here are the empty nymphal cases of Isonychia bicolor mayflies which hatched in early fall in the Catskills by crawling out onto a rock.

From the Beaverkill River in New York

Closeup insects by Troutnut from the Beaverkill River and Miscellaneous New York in New York

Ruler view of a Female Isonychia bicolor (Isonychiidae) (Mahogany Dun) Mayfly Dun from the Beaverkill River in New York The smallest ruler marks are 1/16".
Ruler view of a Male Ephemerellidae (Hendricksons, Sulphurs, PMDs, BWOs) Mayfly Dun from unknown in New York The smallest ruler marks are 1/16".

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