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Lateral view of a Female Hexagenia limbata (Ephemeridae) (Hex) Mayfly Dun from the Namekagon River in Wisconsin
Hex Mayflies
Hexagenia limbata

The famous nocturnal Hex hatch of the Midwest (and a few other lucky locations) stirs to the surface mythically large brown trout that only touch streamers for the rest of the year.

Dorsal view of a Holocentropus (Polycentropodidae) Caddisfly Larva from the Yakima River in Washington
This one seems to tentatively key to Holocentropus, although I can't make out the anal spines in Couplet 7 of the Key to Genera of Polycentropodidae Larvae nor the dark bands in Couplet 4 of the Key to Genera of Polycentropodidae Larvae, making me wonder if I went wrong somewhere in keying it out. I don't see where that could have happened, though. It might also be that it's a very immature larva and doesn't possess all the identifying characteristics in the key yet. If Holocentropus is correct, then Holocentropus flavus and Holocentropus interruptus are the two likely possibilities based on range, but I was not able to find a description of their larvae.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
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The Beaverkill is perhaps the most famous fly fishing stream in America, largely because of its history, and it can still be a good one if you don't let its history spoil your expectations.

Almost every pool has a name and a story or three in the great works of fly fishing literature.

Landscape & scenery photos from the Beaverkill River

This 15" brown trout took a small emergent sparkle pupa on a large Catskill river.
Here's an underwater post-release picture of a 15" brown trout I caught in a clear Catskill river.
This is Cairn's Pool on the Beaverkill, possibly the most famous pool in all of trout fishing.

From the Beaverkill River in New York
The Beaverkill River in New York
I'm breaking my rule about naming locations for this picture, since the context adds much to its meaning.  This great blue heron is standing on a slab of river-worn concrete silhouetted against the NY Quickway bridge over the Beaverkill River at Cairn's Pool.  Several human fishermen pursue trout from one shore while an avian fisherman pursues them from the other.

From the Beaverkill River in New York
The Beaverkill River in New York
The Beaverkill River, Cooks Falls Pool in New York
Two storied Catskill rivers become one at this pool.

From the Beaverkill River in New York
The Beaverkill River, Horton Bridge Pool in New York
This popular Catskill stream was a bit crowded on one of the prime days of the Hendrickson hatch.

From the Beaverkill River in New York
Oops.

I let my little light cahill spinner dangle in the air a bit too long while looking for rises.  There were at least 30 bats flying around the pool, and this one hooked itself on my fly.  I just let it fly around my rod tip and, while trying to figure out what to do, I took some pictures.  (When in doubt...)  Eventually it managed to unhook itself and fly away.

From the Beaverkill River in New York
A swift tributary of a Catskill trout stream slides down its own high delta of boulders and cobble.

From the Beaverkill River, Horton Bridge Pool in New York

On-stream insect photos from the Beaverkill River

Caddis on Catskill cobble.

From the Beaverkill River in New York
The Beaverkill River in New York
I found this little Paraleptophlebia dun along a Catskill stream, but not enough of her brethren were emerging to get the early-season trout to rise.

From the Beaverkill River in New York
Here are the empty nymphal cases of Isonychia bicolor mayflies which hatched in early fall in the Catskills by crawling out onto a rock.

From the Beaverkill River in New York
An ant struggles to escape the surface of a Catskill stream.  The black dot on the right is the ant's shadow on a rock on the bottom.  I can see how this would appeal to a trout.  Even I kind of want to eat the thing.

From the Beaverkill River, Horton Bridge Pool in New York
I'm not sure what the caddisflies in this tight cluster are doing, but I'd guess it has something to do with mating.  They scooted all around the rock, with some flies leaving the cluster and new ones coming all the time.

From the Beaverkill River in New York

Closeup insects by Troutnut from the Beaverkill River in New York

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