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Lateral view of a Male Baetis (Baetidae) (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Dun from Mystery Creek #43 in New York
Blue-winged Olives
Baetis

Tiny Baetis mayflies are perhaps the most commonly encountered and imitated by anglers on all American trout streams due to their great abundance, widespread distribution, and trout-friendly emergence habits.

Lateral view of a Male Baetidae (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Dun from Mystery Creek #308 in Washington
This dun emerged from a mature nymph on my desk. Unfortunately its wings didn't perfectly dry out.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
Troutnut is a project started in 2003 by salmonid ecologist Jason "Troutnut" Neuswanger to help anglers and fly tyers unabashedly embrace the entomological side of the sport. Learn more about Troutnut or support the project for an enhanced experience here.

Case view of a Psilotreta labida (Odontoceridae) (Dark Blue Sedge) Caddisfly Larva from Fall Creek in New York
Troutnut
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Administrator
Bellevue, WA

Posts: 2758
Troutnut on Apr 2, 2007April 2nd, 2007, 6:00 pm EDT
I added several new bugs I collected this week to the site tonight, including this caddisfly. Anybody care to ID it?

To view all the new specimens, go to any page of this site outside the forum section (like the homepage) and look under "recent updates" in the left column.

I'll be adding some even better bug pictures tomorrow from a collecting trip a couple days later.
Jason Neuswanger, Ph.D.
Troutnut and salmonid ecologist
BGrnFlyfish
Wisconsin

Posts: 37
BGrnFlyfish on Feb 12, 2009February 12th, 2009, 4:19 am EST
Jason,

I was on a stream the other day in the driftless area and i found a couple of caddis on some of the rocks. They looked exactly like this one does but for their casing it wasn't used with little rocks, it was the wood type casing. -(brownish black) the caddis had a green body and a head like that one..
Seth-Big Green River, WI
Troutnut
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Administrator
Bellevue, WA

Posts: 2758
Troutnut on Feb 12, 2009February 12th, 2009, 7:16 am EST
Lots of cased caddisflies look similar to this, with the green body and dark head. You often have to get into trickier anatomical details to figure out the genus, or even the family.
Jason Neuswanger, Ph.D.
Troutnut and salmonid ecologist
Creno
Grants Pass, OR

Posts: 302
Creno on Feb 12, 2009February 12th, 2009, 1:04 pm EST
Interesting timing - I was just looking at Psilotreta larvae yesterday. This one is probably Psilotreta labida.

Creno

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