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Artistic view of a Male Pteronarcys californica (Pteronarcyidae) (Giant Salmonfly) Stonefly Adult from the Gallatin River in Montana
Salmonflies
Pteronarcys californica

The giant Salmonflies of the Western mountains are legendary for their proclivity to elicit consistent dry-fly action and ferocious strikes.

Dorsal view of a Holocentropus (Polycentropodidae) Caddisfly Larva from the Yakima River in Washington
This one seems to tentatively key to Holocentropus, although I can't make out the anal spines in Couplet 7 of the Key to Genera of Polycentropodidae Larvae nor the dark bands in Couplet 4 of the Key to Genera of Polycentropodidae Larvae, making me wonder if I went wrong somewhere in keying it out. I don't see where that could have happened, though. It might also be that it's a very immature larva and doesn't possess all the identifying characteristics in the key yet. If Holocentropus is correct, then Holocentropus flavus and Holocentropus interruptus are the two likely possibilities based on range, but I was not able to find a description of their larvae.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
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Montanafish
Montanafish's profile picture
Montana

Posts: 1
Montanafish on Aug 17, 2020August 17th, 2020, 8:17 am EDT
Hello everyone. This is my first post so I'd like to say hello and thank you in advance for any tips.

I'm mostly a spin caster/trolling type fisher woman. I grew up in Ohio fishing on bass/crappie/bluegill ponds. When I was in my teens I picked up fly fishing, but haven't fly fished in 15 years or so.

I went fly fishing this weekend and it was amazing! I forgot how much I loved it but my 15-20 year old fly line has a rough spot in it. I am assuming I can't cut that section off, so I've been looking for a new fly line.

What should I get??? I don't want to spend a mint but want value. And does color matter? There is some seemingly nice line from Bozeman but the colors seem on the outrageous side. That said, I am female and I like my gear to reflect that in my own girl power way. So if color doesn't matter I may go for their pink and purple line. If color matters I won't. I've done and internet search and can't seem to get any real responses. I will likely be fishing clear montana rivers with good flow. However general all around line is best since I'm a mom and don't get to invest a ton into my hobbies.
Wbranch
Wbranch's profile picture
York & Starlight PA

Posts: 2635
Wbranch on Aug 22, 2020August 22nd, 2020, 12:56 pm EDT
Hi Montana fish,

We need to know the "weight" line the rod is designed to cast most effectively. On the butt section, usually a few inches above the cork grip there will be some rod nomenclature. It will list the length of the rod, the line weight, and often the rod weight. The line weight will be defined numerically. Most likely you will want a #5 - #6 weight line. Orvis sells a lesser expense, but still good quality line called the "Clearwater". I think it is less than $50. There are some lesser known line brands where you can get a good line for $30 - $50. To cast with the most distance and least effort you will want a "Weight Forward Floating" line.
Catskill fly fisher for fifty-five years.
Gene_PA
Gene_PA's profile picture
Lebanon, PA

Posts: 6
Gene_PA on Aug 22, 2020August 22nd, 2020, 1:41 pm EDT
I would also suggest that you get a fly line that has a welded loop at the front end, to make it easier to change leaders without a nail knot.
Wbranch
Wbranch's profile picture
York & Starlight PA

Posts: 2635
Wbranch on Aug 23, 2020August 23rd, 2020, 4:35 am EDT
I would also suggest that you get a fly line that has a welded loop at the front end, to make it easier to change leaders without a nail knot.


This a good idea. Many fly lines now have the front welded loop. Great addition if you aren't familiar with tying a nail knot. I cut off the welded loops on my #4 - #5 lines and attach my leader with a nail knot and then add a 1.5 mm tippet ring to the end of the leader. Then add 3' - 4' of 4X - 6X tippet. One tapered leader will last an entire season barring a really bad wind knot. On lines #6 and higher I leave the loop on as I'm not looking for finesse with heavier lines.
Catskill fly fisher for fifty-five years.
Red_green_h
Red_green_h's profile picture
New Mexico

Posts: 64
Red_green_h on Sep 24, 2020September 24th, 2020, 1:11 pm EDT
and then add a 1.5 mm tippet ring to the end of the leader


I started using tippet rings this year. Love 'em. I always cut the loop off and tie nail knots on just so I don't get out of practice.

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