Header image
Enter a name
Lateral view of a Female Hexagenia limbata (Ephemeridae) (Hex) Mayfly Dun from the Namekagon River in Wisconsin
Hex Mayflies
Hexagenia limbata

The famous nocturnal Hex hatch of the Midwest (and a few other lucky locations) stirs to the surface mythically large brown trout that only touch streamers for the rest of the year.

Dorsal view of a Amphizoa (Amphizoidae) Beetle Larva from Sears Creek in Washington
This is the first of it's family I've seen, collected from a tiny, fishless stream in the Cascades. The three species of this genus all live in the Northwest and are predators that primarily eat stonefly nymphs Merritt R.W., Cummins, K.W., and Berg, M.B. (2019).
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
Troutnut is a project started in 2003 by salmonid ecologist Jason "Troutnut" Neuswanger to help anglers and fly tyers unabashedly embrace the entomological side of the sport. Learn more about Troutnut or support the project for an enhanced experience here.

Iasgair
Iasgair's profile picture
Colorado

Posts: 148
Iasgair on Jan 1, 2019January 1st, 2019, 2:23 pm EST
The only place I know that sells Magpie is Whitetail Fly Tieing, and they are sold out.

Does anyone know another shop that carries magpie?
Martinlf
Martinlf's profile picture
Moderator
Palmyra PA

Posts: 3047
Martinlf on Jan 1, 2019January 1st, 2019, 2:34 pm EST
"He spread them a yard and a half. 'And every one that got away is this big.'"

--Fred Chappell
Iasgair
Iasgair's profile picture
Colorado

Posts: 148
Iasgair on Jan 2, 2019January 2nd, 2019, 11:17 am EST
Thanks Martin. That's going to be the place I think. It's a little inconvenient because I have to contact my credit card company and tell them I'm purchasing items from there, but I have done it before.

I was just hoping there would be someplace here.

Why is it when it comes to items like this, they are so difficult to find in this country?
Wbranch
Wbranch's profile picture
York & Starlight PA

Posts: 2635
Wbranch on Jan 2, 2019January 2nd, 2019, 10:59 pm EST
Are they a protected bird? They are everywhere in Montana. Have a friend with an air rifle shoot one for you.
Catskill fly fisher for fifty-five years.
Creno
Grants Pass, OR

Posts: 302
Creno on Jan 3, 2019January 3rd, 2019, 9:26 am EST
Most non-game birds are protected in the US.

https://www.fws.gov/birds/policies-and-regulations/laws-legislations/migratory-bird-treaty-act.php
Wbranch
Wbranch's profile picture
York & Starlight PA

Posts: 2635
Wbranch on Jan 3, 2019January 3rd, 2019, 11:51 am EST
It is a good thing because in many European countries "hunters" and I use the term loosely, are killing song birds to the point of near extinction.

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2015/aug/26/conservationists-appalled-at-illegal-killing-of-25m-birds-a-year-in-the-mediterranean
Catskill fly fisher for fifty-five years.
Martinlf
Martinlf's profile picture
Moderator
Palmyra PA

Posts: 3047
Martinlf on Jan 3, 2019January 3rd, 2019, 1:20 pm EST
Yeah, with the exception of non-native, invasive, English/house sparrows and starlings, I believe all other eastern birds that are not designated as game birds are protected by federal law. I don't know if there are other invasive species out west that are also not protected. But I believe magpies would be. I wonder if starling would make an acceptable substitute? I've shot several of those and skinned them out.
"He spread them a yard and a half. 'And every one that got away is this big.'"

--Fred Chappell
NedZeppelin
NedZeppelin's profile picture
Warwick, PA

Posts: 1
NedZeppelin on Jan 11, 2019January 11th, 2019, 9:29 pm EST
I acquired the tail feathers from England, but had a helpful fellow also send me one from Montana. I am new to North Country spiders, but vowed at the end of last season that I had just about had it with purple squiggly worms and dredging beadhead and heavily weighted nymphs through runs while staring at a thingamabobber. No more. So this year it is spiders only, you can fish them dry, wet and if on a heavy hook, get them into the deeper water. Body count is not everything.

But back to the herl. I believe only the tail feathers are the source and you wrap the fiber just like peacock herl. I don’t think starling is a substitute. Acquiring materials to tie these flies is somewhat daunting, especially since I arrive at this new found passion after Pearsalls gossamer is made no more, and existing stocks at merchants are dwindling and pricey.
Martinlf
Martinlf's profile picture
Moderator
Palmyra PA

Posts: 3047
Martinlf on Jan 12, 2019January 12th, 2019, 6:41 am EST
Sorry to hear about Pearsall's gossamer. Silk thread can be found many places, though, in many colors.
"He spread them a yard and a half. 'And every one that got away is this big.'"

--Fred Chappell
Iasgair
Iasgair's profile picture
Colorado

Posts: 148
Iasgair on Jan 17, 2019January 17th, 2019, 2:58 pm EST
Thanks guys. I was wondering if non game birds were protected in the U.S..

Maybe if I'm lucky I'll run one over while it's having road kill for lunch.

It's a sad thing about Pearsalls silk. There's a company in France that is making silk thread, but can't remember the name of it. Semperfli has now the nano silk, which I think I will be trying out soon. They are trying very hard to match the colors in Harfield H. Edmonds book "Brook and River Trouting".
And from what I have seen, they are doing a fine job at it.
Wbranch
Wbranch's profile picture
York & Starlight PA

Posts: 2635
Wbranch on Jan 17, 2019January 17th, 2019, 3:48 pm EST
I looked it up and there are a number of unprotected US birds. Starlings and English sparrows are unprotected and you can kill them. However you might want to check with your states hunting regulations to see if you would need a hunting license.

https://www.jcehrlich.com/blog/3-non-native-birds-that-are-not-federally-protected]
Catskill fly fisher for fifty-five years.
Iasgair
Iasgair's profile picture
Colorado

Posts: 148
Iasgair on Jan 28, 2019January 28th, 2019, 2:09 am EST
Good to know Matt, thank you.

Yep, just checked for protected migratory birds and Magpie is on the list. I can't even pick up feather and use it.

Quick Reply

Related Discussions

Topic
Replies
Last Reply
16
Feb 17, 2015
by Kschaefer3
14
Mar 11, 2015
by Oldredbarn
11
Feb 23, 2013
by Entoman
Troutnut.com is copyright © 2004-2024 (email Jason). privacy policy