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Lateral view of a Male Baetis (Baetidae) (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Dun from Mystery Creek #43 in New York
Blue-winged Olives
Baetis

Tiny Baetis mayflies are perhaps the most commonly encountered and imitated by anglers on all American trout streams due to their great abundance, widespread distribution, and trout-friendly emergence habits.

Dorsal view of a Setvena wahkeena (Perlodidae) (Wahkeena Springfly) Stonefly Nymph from Mystery Creek #199 in Washington
As far as I can tell, this species has only previously been reported from one site in Oregon along the Columbia gorge. However, the key characteristics are fairly unmistakable in all except for one minor detail:
— 4 small yellow spots on frons visible in photos
— Narrow occipital spinule row curves forward (but doesn’t quite meet on stem of ecdysial suture, as it's supposed to in this species)
— Short spinules on anterior margin of front legs
— Short rposterior row of blunt spinules on abdominal tergae, rather than elongated spinules dorsally
I caught several of these mature nymphs in the fishless, tiny headwaters of a creek high in the Wenatchee Mountains.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
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Photos by Troutnut from the South Fork Stillaguamish River in Washington

The South Fork Stillaguamish River in Washington
The South Fork Stillaguamish River in Washington
The South Fork Stillaguamish River in Washington
The South Fork Stillaguamish River in Washington
The South Fork Stillaguamish River in Washington
The South Fork Stillaguamish River in Washington
The South Fork Stillaguamish River in Washington
The South Fork Stillaguamish River in Washington

Closeup insects by Troutnut from the South Fork Stillaguamish River in Washington

Lateral view of a Female Ephemerellidae (Hendricksons, Sulphurs, PMDs, BWOs) Mayfly Dun from the South Fork Stillaguamish River in Washington
This one was collected in association with a male spinner, but they appear to be different families.
Lateral view of a Male Cinygmula (Heptageniidae) (Dark Red Quill) Mayfly Spinner from the South Fork Stillaguamish River in Washington
I'm unsure of the ID on this one; keys put it closest to Cinygmula reticulata, but I'm very doubtful of the species and not positive on the genus. Epeorus is another possibility, but I don't know which species it would be.

This one was collected in association with a female dun probably of a different family.

Comments / replies

Martinlf
Martinlf's profile picture
Moderator
Palmyra PA

Posts: 3047
Martinlf on Jul 2, 2017July 2nd, 2017, 12:25 pm EDT
Beautiful photos, Jason.
"He spread them a yard and a half. 'And every one that got away is this big.'"

--Fred Chappell
Jmd123
Jmd123's profile picture
Oscoda, MI

Posts: 2474
Jmd123 on Jul 2, 2017July 2nd, 2017, 12:31 pm EDT
Gorgeous! Reminds me of Oregon, including the heavily-spotted rainbows in the McKenzie River. Looks like some nice bigleaf maples in the background on the last photo. Gotta get back to that part of the world again sometime...

Jonathon
No matter how big the one you just caught is, there's always a bigger one out there somewhere...

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