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Lateral view of a Male Baetis (Baetidae) (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Dun from Mystery Creek #43 in New York
Blue-winged Olives
Baetis

Tiny Baetis mayflies are perhaps the most commonly encountered and imitated by anglers on all American trout streams due to their great abundance, widespread distribution, and trout-friendly emergence habits.

Dorsal view of a Neoleptophlebia (Leptophlebiidae) Mayfly Nymph from the Yakima River in Washington
Some characteristics from the microscope images for the tentative species id: The postero-lateral projections are found only on segment 9, not segment 8. Based on the key in Jacobus et al. (2014), it appears to key to Neoleptophlebia adoptiva or Neoleptophlebia heteronea, same as this specimen with pretty different abdominal markings. However, distinguishing between those calls for comparing the lengths of the second and third segment of the labial palp, and this one (like the other one) only seems to have two segments. So I'm stuck on them both. It's likely that the fact that they're immature nymphs stymies identification in some important way.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
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Iasgair
Iasgair's profile picture
Colorado

Posts: 148
Iasgair on Feb 22, 2017February 22nd, 2017, 10:45 am EST
Hello friends. By accident, I found this forum, so I looked around a little to get the feel of it and thought, why not join? So here I am.

I'm a traditionalist when it comes to fishing, and what I mean by that is I stick to dry flies and North Country Spiders. Anything else seems drab to me, but then I fish for myself and no other at a level I enjoy.

I fish the streams of Boulder County and the RMNP quite often, but once in awhile will fish bigger rivers. I find better solitude on the creeks and streams and prefer them much more.

I am looking forward to getting to know all of you through your posts, and share in your adventures as well.
Martinlf
Martinlf's profile picture
Moderator
Palmyra PA

Posts: 3047
Martinlf on Feb 22, 2017February 22nd, 2017, 1:02 pm EST
Welcome! Fishing dries and spiders is certainly an interesting and productive approach. I've always hoped to fish wet flies more, and it is one of my ongoing projects. One thing I've learned is their versatility. The archives here have a lot of information, so if you are interested in any topic don't hesitate to do a search.
"He spread them a yard and a half. 'And every one that got away is this big.'"

--Fred Chappell
Wbranch
Wbranch's profile picture
York & Starlight PA

Posts: 2635
Wbranch on Feb 22, 2017February 22nd, 2017, 1:18 pm EST
Welcome to Troutnut.com a better bunch of troutaholics will be hard to find!

What exactly are North Country Spiders and what is the RMNP to the bewildered souls like me?
Catskill fly fisher for fifty-five years.
Iasgair
Iasgair's profile picture
Colorado

Posts: 148
Iasgair on Feb 22, 2017February 22nd, 2017, 3:02 pm EST
Welcome to Troutnut.com a better bunch of troutaholics will be hard to find!

What exactly are North Country Spiders and what is the RMNP to the bewildered souls like me?



My apologies. The RMNP is the Rocky Mountain National Park here in Colorado.

As for North Country Spiders, one of, if not the most famous of the spider family is Stewarts Black Spider from Scotland.

http://www.tenkarabum.com/stewart-spider.html

There are also other patterns you may have heard of like the Partridge & Orange, Waterhen Bloa, Purple & Snipe.

http://www.ffisw.com/2011/02/north-country-spiders-part-2-partridge-orange/

They are very old flies from the UK, and many fishermen, including myself agree that when nothing is working, the spiders will take trout. I never go fishing without them. The best way to fish them is casting directly upstream.

One of the greatest books on spiders is W.C.Stewarts The Practical Angler. Lovely read.
Wbranch
Wbranch's profile picture
York & Starlight PA

Posts: 2635
Wbranch on Feb 22, 2017February 22nd, 2017, 3:59 pm EST
There are also other patterns you may have heard of like the Partridge & Orange, Waterhen Bloa, Purple & Snipe.


Nope, never heard of any of them. Regarding casting my flies, I like casting them downstream, across stream, diagonally, and if I'm wearing my tweed sport coat upstream of course.


Catskill fly fisher for fifty-five years.
Falsifly
Falsifly's profile picture
Hayward, WI.

Posts: 660
Falsifly on Feb 22, 2017February 22nd, 2017, 11:25 pm EST
and if I'm wearing my tweed sport coat upstream of course.


Got a chuckle out of that Matt.
Falsifly
When asked what I just caught that monster on I showed him. He put on his magnifiers and said, "I can't believe they can see that."
Iasgair
Iasgair's profile picture
Colorado

Posts: 148
Iasgair on Feb 23, 2017February 23rd, 2017, 10:03 am EST
and if I'm wearing my tweed sport coat upstream of course.




I am Scottish, and when I do wade the creeks, I fish in kilts. It's a whole new concept to wet wading, ha ha.

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