Header image
Enter a name
Lateral view of a Male Baetis (Baetidae) (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Dun from Mystery Creek #43 in New York
Blue-winged Olives
Baetis

Tiny Baetis mayflies are perhaps the most commonly encountered and imitated by anglers on all American trout streams due to their great abundance, widespread distribution, and trout-friendly emergence habits.

Dorsal view of a Zapada cinctipes (Nemouridae) (Tiny Winter Black) Stonefly Nymph from the Yakima River in Washington
Nymphs of this species were fairly common in late-winter kick net samples from the upper Yakima River. Although I could not find a key to species of Zapada nymphs, a revision of the Nemouridae family by Baumann (1975) includes the following helpful sentence: "2 cervical gills on each side of midline, 1 arising inside and 1 outside of lateral cervical sclerites, usually single and elongate, sometimes constricted but with 3 or 4 branches arising beyond gill base in Zapada cinctipes." This specimen clearly has the branches and is within the range of that species.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
Troutnut is a project started in 2003 by salmonid ecologist Jason "Troutnut" Neuswanger to help anglers and fly tyers unabashedly embrace the entomological side of the sport. Learn more about Troutnut or support the project for an enhanced experience here.

Wiflyfisher
Wiflyfisher's profile picture
Wisconsin

Posts: 622
Wiflyfisher on Sep 28, 2016September 28th, 2016, 4:37 pm EDT
Okay, Jason and Western guys what is this chartreuse midge called?



I just got back from Montana and this is the second year I have seen this midge during sunny, mid-days and some trout were taking them in the drift.

John
Taxon
Taxon's profile picture
Site Editor
Plano, TX

Posts: 1311
Taxon on Sep 29, 2016September 29th, 2016, 4:32 am EDT
Hi John-

I suggest you contact Ethan Bright at ethanbr@umich.edu, but this one is pretty close.

Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
Falsifly
Falsifly's profile picture
Hayward, WI.

Posts: 660
Falsifly on Sep 29, 2016September 29th, 2016, 5:25 am EDT
John, did you tie or use anything to resemble the pupa or adult? If so were you successful?
Falsifly
When asked what I just caught that monster on I showed him. He put on his magnifiers and said, "I can't believe they can see that."
Wiflyfisher
Wiflyfisher's profile picture
Wisconsin

Posts: 622
Wiflyfisher on Sep 29, 2016September 29th, 2016, 6:02 pm EDT
John, did you tie or use anything to resemble the pupa or adult? If so were you successful?

Yes, I had a small soft hackle with a lime green body that did okay. Then I tied up several parachute style dries with a chartreuse strand body material. If I saw a trout take a chartreuse midge I dropped my pattern a couple feet in front and they generally took my pattern.

The midge had a short window of effectiveness because Trico spinners shortly afterwards appeared and the trout immediately switched to the growing number of tiny spinners spread eagle in the drift.
Wiflyfisher
Wiflyfisher's profile picture
Wisconsin

Posts: 622
Wiflyfisher on Sep 29, 2016September 29th, 2016, 6:07 pm EDT
Hi John-

I suggest you contact Ethan Bright at ethanbr@umich.edu, but this one is pretty close.


Roger, thanks.. it is nice to see you are still hanging around here. The BugGuide midge looks almost the same and was from MT and says was photographed the end of August 2010. So close to the same time period and area.

I did find another chironomid in France that seemed similar to the chartreuse midge from the West Yellowstone area that I saw.

Quick Reply

Related Discussions

Topic
Replies
Last Reply
4
Jan 21, 2009
by Taxon
2
Jan 2, 2008
by Martinlf
Troutnut.com is copyright © 2004-2024 (email Jason). privacy policy