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Lateral view of a Male Baetis (Baetidae) (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Dun from Mystery Creek #43 in New York
Blue-winged Olives
Baetis

Tiny Baetis mayflies are perhaps the most commonly encountered and imitated by anglers on all American trout streams due to their great abundance, widespread distribution, and trout-friendly emergence habits.

Dorsal view of a Limnephilidae (Giant Sedges) Caddisfly Larva from the Yakima River in Washington
This specimen resembled several others of around the same size and perhaps the same species, which were pretty common in my February sample from the upper Yakima. Unfortunately, I misplaced the specimen before I could get it under a microscope for a definitive ID.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
Troutnut is a project started in 2003 by salmonid ecologist Jason "Troutnut" Neuswanger to help anglers and fly tyers unabashedly embrace the entomological side of the sport. Learn more about Troutnut or support the project for an enhanced experience here.

Millcreek has attached these 6 pictures. The message is below.
Millcreek
Healdsburg, CA

Posts: 344
Millcreek on Mar 6, 2015March 6th, 2015, 6:08 am EST
These are common in the Russian River and Mill Creek. They're usually
present from February through June. These were keyed out using Merritt, Cummins and Berg (2008).

The first few pictures were taken of specimens preserved in alcohol and they have lost most of their color. The pictures were taken to show some of the features which separate them from Brachycentrus and Micrasema spp.

Cases are approximately 15 mm long and larvae about 10 mm long. They're usually found on torrent sedge or algae laden rocks.
"If we knew what it was we were doing, it would not be called research, would it?"
-Albert Einstein
Martinlf
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Moderator
Palmyra PA

Posts: 3047
Martinlf on Mar 6, 2015March 6th, 2015, 7:12 am EST
features which separate them from Brachycentrus and Micrasema spp.


Mark, could you elaborate, specifying those features? Also thanks again for the photos. Stunning.
"He spread them a yard and a half. 'And every one that got away is this big.'"

--Fred Chappell
Millcreek
Healdsburg, CA

Posts: 344
Millcreek on Mar 6, 2015March 6th, 2015, 8:51 am EST
Mark, could you elaborate, specifying those features?


Brachycentrus would have different legs, with a longer femora and a tibia with a prominent spur.

Micrasema would have the pronotal groove curving anteriorly, with the ends of the groove usually meeting the anterior margin.

Amiocentrus would have a shorter femora, a tibia without a prominent spur,
the ends of the pronotal groove not meeting the anterior margin and a mesonotal sa1 with a solitary setae on each side.
"If we knew what it was we were doing, it would not be called research, would it?"
-Albert Einstein
Crepuscular
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Boiling Springs, PA

Posts: 920
Crepuscular on Mar 7, 2015March 7th, 2015, 2:09 am EST
Nice post Mark! I see a fair number of Micrasema here in PA. I love seeing your western bugs!
Gutcutter
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Pennsylvania

Posts: 470
Gutcutter on Mar 7, 2015March 7th, 2015, 4:48 am EST
Way cool! Great photos, as usual, Mark
All men who fish may in turn be divided into two parts: those who fish for trout and those who don't. Trout fishermen are a race apart: they are a dedicated crew- indolent, improvident, and quietly mad.

-Robert Traver, Trout Madness
Millcreek
Healdsburg, CA

Posts: 344
Millcreek on Mar 7, 2015March 7th, 2015, 5:10 am EST
Eric and Gutcutter-

Thanks, glad you enjoyed them.
"If we knew what it was we were doing, it would not be called research, would it?"
-Albert Einstein

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