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Artistic view of a Male Pteronarcys californica (Pteronarcyidae) (Giant Salmonfly) Stonefly Adult from the Gallatin River in Montana
Salmonflies
Pteronarcys californica

The giant Salmonflies of the Western mountains are legendary for their proclivity to elicit consistent dry-fly action and ferocious strikes.

27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
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Byhaugh has attached this picture to aid in identification. The message is below.
Byhaugh
Hawaii

Posts: 56
Byhaugh on Feb 12, 2015February 12th, 2015, 9:21 am EST
Hi,
My son and I just returned from a trip to the Chillean side of Patagonia.
Other than Caddis, beetles, and hoppers, there was not a lot of insect activity.
I did see this spinner and believe I know what it is, but looking for verification.

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Millcreek
Healdsburg, CA

Posts: 344
Millcreek on Feb 13, 2015February 13th, 2015, 8:32 am EST
Byron,

I'll bite, a member of Leptophlebiidae. You seem to have lost two of the caudal tails (or possibly just one if I'm entirely wrong). Can't even begin to guess the genera if I'm right, there are just too many.

Mark
"If we knew what it was we were doing, it would not be called research, would it?"
-Albert Einstein
Entoman
Entoman's profile picture
Northern CA & ID

Posts: 2604
Entoman on Feb 13, 2015February 13th, 2015, 4:24 pm EST
Based on the long legs, body shape and heavy wing venation I'll go with heptageniid... Only a guess, though.
"It's not that I find fishing so important, it's just that I find all other endeavors of Man equally unimportant... And not nearly as much fun!" Robert Traver, Anatomy of a Fisherman
Taxon
Taxon's profile picture
Site Editor
Plano, TX

Posts: 1311
Taxon on Feb 14, 2015February 14th, 2015, 2:20 am EST
Kurt-

I'll go with heptageniid... Only a guess, though.


That was my instinct as well, at least until I discovered that South America doesn't have a single species of family Hetageniidae. You will have to copy and paste

http://www.flyfishingentomology.com/SAMayflyDistributionQuery.htm

into your web brouser's address window in order verify that, as this forum converts all hyperlinked addresses to all lower case for some unknown reason.

Hint hint, Jason :-)
Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
Millcreek
Healdsburg, CA

Posts: 344
Millcreek on Feb 14, 2015February 14th, 2015, 7:13 am EST
Kurt and Roger,

Or perhaps a member of Nesameletidae. Found this picture of a female.
http://www.terrain.net.nz/friends-of-te-henui-group/local-flies/mayflies.html
It's a New Zealand site but the genus shows up in Chile as well.
"If we knew what it was we were doing, it would not be called research, would it?"
-Albert Einstein

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