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Lateral view of a Male Baetis (Baetidae) (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Dun from Mystery Creek #43 in New York
Blue-winged Olives
Baetis

Tiny Baetis mayflies are perhaps the most commonly encountered and imitated by anglers on all American trout streams due to their great abundance, widespread distribution, and trout-friendly emergence habits.

Dorsal view of a Setvena wahkeena (Perlodidae) (Wahkeena Springfly) Stonefly Nymph from Mystery Creek #199 in Washington
As far as I can tell, this species has only previously been reported from one site in Oregon along the Columbia gorge. However, the key characteristics are fairly unmistakable in all except for one minor detail:
— 4 small yellow spots on frons visible in photos
— Narrow occipital spinule row curves forward (but doesn’t quite meet on stem of ecdysial suture, as it's supposed to in this species)
— Short spinules on anterior margin of front legs
— Short rposterior row of blunt spinules on abdominal tergae, rather than elongated spinules dorsally
I caught several of these mature nymphs in the fishless, tiny headwaters of a creek high in the Wenatchee Mountains.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
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Kschaefer3
Kschaefer3's profile picture
St. Paul, MN

Posts: 376
Kschaefer3 on Feb 29, 2016February 29th, 2016, 6:05 am EST
I am starting to plan a trip to Slough Creek for this summer. Regardless of whether it works out or not, I want to start tying flies for the trip since I will go at some point if not this summer. If you are willing to share, what are your favorite emerger, dun and spinner patterns for PMDs and green drakes?

Thanks in advance for any help!
Wbranch
Wbranch's profile picture
York & Starlight PA

Posts: 2635
Wbranch on Feb 29, 2016February 29th, 2016, 12:29 pm EST
Kyle, Didn't I give you a bunch of PMD recipes a couple of years ago when you fished the Missouri?
Catskill fly fisher for fifty-five years.
Wbranch
Wbranch's profile picture
York & Starlight PA

Posts: 2635
Wbranch on Feb 29, 2016February 29th, 2016, 12:38 pm EST
I really don't think those Slough Creek trout are going to be that fussy about patterns. I'd tie, or buy, some #16 Yellow Humpy's, tie an assortment of BH PT nymphs in #14 & #16, some typical emergers; #16 light wire scud hooks, tail a couple wood duck fibers over which you tie some crinkly brown z-lon, abdomen - wind PT tail fibers and counter wrap with X fine gold wire, Thorax light yellow beaver, wing light dun CDC tied in short.

Oh, I forgot, tie some #14 & #16 rusty spinners with either X-wing hackle from Gary Borger's "Designing Trout Flies", or poly wing spinners.

Here is one variation; the tail are brown turkey fibers (so the ass end will sink) the wing is natural dark dun instead of the light dun. All CDC is not created equal! Most of the packaged CDC at fly shops is just scraps and junk. You are lucky to get a few decent, not great, feathers out of a package. I buy all my CDC from one source and imo I is the best. Trouthunter in Last Chance, ID. They have two or three natural color and a few dyed colors. It comes in a small package and in large, 1/4 ounce, bag. I always buy the large bag and I thin it costs $17.50. It is really worth it as most every feather is very good. The barbules are very dense.

http://www.shop.trouthunt.com/

Catskill fly fisher for fifty-five years.
Kschaefer3
Kschaefer3's profile picture
St. Paul, MN

Posts: 376
Kschaefer3 on Mar 1, 2016March 1st, 2016, 4:02 am EST
Yes you did, Matt! I just found the email. Thank you! I love that PMD emerger. What kind of turkey feather do you use for the tail? Sorry, I'm still a novice at this.
Wbranch
Wbranch's profile picture
York & Starlight PA

Posts: 2635
Wbranch on Mar 1, 2016March 1st, 2016, 9:00 am EST
Kyle,

They are called secondary tail feathers. They are the shorter feathers closer to the turkey's rump. If you look close you will see a horizontal black band across each secondary. I just use a clump of the fiber tips 4-6. I like them better than the tips of pheasant tails as they have more body.

Catskill fly fisher for fifty-five years.
Jmd123
Jmd123's profile picture
Oscoda, MI

Posts: 2474
Jmd123 on Mar 1, 2016March 1st, 2016, 12:50 pm EST
Daffodils! Green grass! Aaaaah, Spring!!

Sorry, snow is coming down sideways again...

Jonathon
No matter how big the one you just caught is, there's always a bigger one out there somewhere...

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